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OCT-A may detect nonexudative CNV in dry AMD

Researchers reported at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting that semi-annual optical coherence tomography-angiography imaging in eyes with intermediate non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration may be useful to stratify the risk for developing exudative choroidal neovascularization.

OCT-A can detect the abnormal blood vessels that cause wet macular degeneration earlier than traditional imaging techniques,” according to a study summary provided to ARVO by author Bailey.

A total of 49 eyes were enrolled in the study. Forty eyes met image quality standards and had follow-up for at least 18 months. Clinical examination and 3 x 3 mm OCT angiograms were routinely obtained with fluorescein angiography, if indicated.

Conversion to CNV required at least one of the following: intra- or subretinal fluid on structural OCT, hemorrhage on examination or leakage with fluorescein angiography.

OCT-A detected nonexudative CNV in five eyes, with three of these developing exudation 1, 2 and 5 months later; one eye remined dormant for 25 months; and one eye was lost to subsequent follow-up. Four eyes developed exudative CNV despite negative OCT-A scans at the previous regular visit 2, 3, 4 and 5 months previously, researchers wrote.

In eyes without nonexudative CNV on regularly scheduled OCT-A, the risk for developing exudative CNV within the subsequent 6 months was 3.8%, according to researchers.

They suggest that OCT-A could detect nonexudative CNV in eyes with intermediate non-neovascular AMD (iAMD).

Regular semi-annual OCT-A of eyes with iAMD may be useful to determine risk for developing exudative CNV, Bailey said. Monitoring the vessels closely can help ensure appropriate and timely treatment.

Reference:

Bailey ST, et al. Early detection of choroidal neovascularization with OCT angiography. Presented at: Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting; May 7-11, 2017; Baltimore.

Disclosure: Bailey reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the abstract for all remaining authors’ financial disclosures.

Researchers reported at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting that semi-annual optical coherence tomography-angiography imaging in eyes with intermediate non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration may be useful to stratify the risk for developing exudative choroidal neovascularization.

OCT-A can detect the abnormal blood vessels that cause wet macular degeneration earlier than traditional imaging techniques,” according to a study summary provided to ARVO by author Bailey.

A total of 49 eyes were enrolled in the study. Forty eyes met image quality standards and had follow-up for at least 18 months. Clinical examination and 3 x 3 mm OCT angiograms were routinely obtained with fluorescein angiography, if indicated.

Conversion to CNV required at least one of the following: intra- or subretinal fluid on structural OCT, hemorrhage on examination or leakage with fluorescein angiography.

OCT-A detected nonexudative CNV in five eyes, with three of these developing exudation 1, 2 and 5 months later; one eye remined dormant for 25 months; and one eye was lost to subsequent follow-up. Four eyes developed exudative CNV despite negative OCT-A scans at the previous regular visit 2, 3, 4 and 5 months previously, researchers wrote.

In eyes without nonexudative CNV on regularly scheduled OCT-A, the risk for developing exudative CNV within the subsequent 6 months was 3.8%, according to researchers.

They suggest that OCT-A could detect nonexudative CNV in eyes with intermediate non-neovascular AMD (iAMD).

Regular semi-annual OCT-A of eyes with iAMD may be useful to determine risk for developing exudative CNV, Bailey said. Monitoring the vessels closely can help ensure appropriate and timely treatment.

Reference:

Bailey ST, et al. Early detection of choroidal neovascularization with OCT angiography. Presented at: Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting; May 7-11, 2017; Baltimore.

Disclosure: Bailey reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the abstract for all remaining authors’ financial disclosures.

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