Smartphone technology facilitates retinal exam in primary care

The use of smartphones as ophthalmoscopes with the D-Eye retinal adapter and app is user friendly and “may help revive retinal examination in primary care,” according to a poster from the Wake Forest School of Medicine presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine annual conference.

Internal medicine residents at Wake Forest participated in a 90-minute workshop where they were educated on normal and pathologic findings of the retina and were able to practice nondilated retinal examination. They also took a pre- and post-survey questionnaire.

During the course of the study, D-Eye was used with iPhone 5/6 and Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphones and compared to the traditional portable ophthalmoscope, according to a press release from D-Eye. Most residents were able to capture the optic disc in their first attempt at using the D-Eye and following the app’s instructions.

None of the residents chose to practice the exam with traditional ophthalmoscopes.

The use of smartphones as ophthalmoscopes was received enthusiastically by residents, according to researchers. – by Abigail Sutton

Reference:

Campos CL, et al. Using smartphone technology to perform funduscopic examination. Presented at: Society of General Internal Medicine annual conference; May 11-14, 2016; Hollywood, Fla.

Disclosure: The researchers reported no relevant financial disclosures.

The use of smartphones as ophthalmoscopes with the D-Eye retinal adapter and app is user friendly and “may help revive retinal examination in primary care,” according to a poster from the Wake Forest School of Medicine presented at the Society of General Internal Medicine annual conference.

Internal medicine residents at Wake Forest participated in a 90-minute workshop where they were educated on normal and pathologic findings of the retina and were able to practice nondilated retinal examination. They also took a pre- and post-survey questionnaire.

During the course of the study, D-Eye was used with iPhone 5/6 and Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphones and compared to the traditional portable ophthalmoscope, according to a press release from D-Eye. Most residents were able to capture the optic disc in their first attempt at using the D-Eye and following the app’s instructions.

None of the residents chose to practice the exam with traditional ophthalmoscopes.

The use of smartphones as ophthalmoscopes was received enthusiastically by residents, according to researchers. – by Abigail Sutton

Reference:

Campos CL, et al. Using smartphone technology to perform funduscopic examination. Presented at: Society of General Internal Medicine annual conference; May 11-14, 2016; Hollywood, Fla.

Disclosure: The researchers reported no relevant financial disclosures.