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Antibiotic resistance remains high among staphylococci

Researchers confirmed the previously noted decrease in methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus but not among coagulase-negative staphylococci, according to the Antibiotic Resistance in Ocular MicRoorganisms study presented at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting.

Researchers also found decreased resistance among S. aureus to azithromycin (62% to 52%), ciprofloxacin (39% to 16%), tobramycin (24% to 6%) and chloramphenicol (6.6% to 52%), and among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) to ciprofloxacin (46% to 22%).

As in previous years, a high proportion of methicillin-resistant staphylococci demonstrated multidrug resistance, although none were vancomycin-resistant, according to researchers.

Additionally, another study from Christine M. Sanfilippo, PhD, used ARMOR data of 385 isolates collected from 19 U.S. sites across 14 states to gauge antibiotic resistance among ocular bacterial pathogens.

Staphylococci resistance rates were generally similar to 2016 rates, with considerable resistance against azithromycin (54% to 66%), oxacillin/methicillin (14% to 56%) and ciprofloxacin (16% to 22%), according to the study.

CoNS isolates exhibited resistance to tobramycin (18%) and trimethoprim (26%).

Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were resistant to azithromycin (32%) and penicillin (36%) but not resistant to fluoroquinolones and chloramphenicol, according to researchers.

Multidrug resistance was observed in 11% of S. aureus and 29% of CoNS and remained prevalent among methicillin-resistant isolates (59% to 65%).

References:

Asbell PA, et al. Antibiotic resistance trends among staphylococci in the ARMOR study: 2009-2017. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology; Honolulu; April 29-May 3, 2018.

Sanfilippo CM, et al. Antibiotic resistance in ocular pathogens – Preliminary results from the 2017 ARMOR Surveillance Program. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology; Honolulu; April 29-May 3, 2018.

Disclosures: Asbell is a consultant to Bausch + Lomb. Sanfilippo is employed by Bausch + Lomb. Please see the full study for all remaining authors’ financial disclosures.

Researchers confirmed the previously noted decrease in methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus but not among coagulase-negative staphylococci, according to the Antibiotic Resistance in Ocular MicRoorganisms study presented at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting.

Researchers also found decreased resistance among S. aureus to azithromycin (62% to 52%), ciprofloxacin (39% to 16%), tobramycin (24% to 6%) and chloramphenicol (6.6% to 52%), and among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) to ciprofloxacin (46% to 22%).

As in previous years, a high proportion of methicillin-resistant staphylococci demonstrated multidrug resistance, although none were vancomycin-resistant, according to researchers.

Additionally, another study from Christine M. Sanfilippo, PhD, used ARMOR data of 385 isolates collected from 19 U.S. sites across 14 states to gauge antibiotic resistance among ocular bacterial pathogens.

Staphylococci resistance rates were generally similar to 2016 rates, with considerable resistance against azithromycin (54% to 66%), oxacillin/methicillin (14% to 56%) and ciprofloxacin (16% to 22%), according to the study.

CoNS isolates exhibited resistance to tobramycin (18%) and trimethoprim (26%).

Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were resistant to azithromycin (32%) and penicillin (36%) but not resistant to fluoroquinolones and chloramphenicol, according to researchers.

Multidrug resistance was observed in 11% of S. aureus and 29% of CoNS and remained prevalent among methicillin-resistant isolates (59% to 65%).

References:

Asbell PA, et al. Antibiotic resistance trends among staphylococci in the ARMOR study: 2009-2017. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology; Honolulu; April 29-May 3, 2018.

Sanfilippo CM, et al. Antibiotic resistance in ocular pathogens – Preliminary results from the 2017 ARMOR Surveillance Program. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology; Honolulu; April 29-May 3, 2018.

Disclosures: Asbell is a consultant to Bausch + Lomb. Sanfilippo is employed by Bausch + Lomb. Please see the full study for all remaining authors’ financial disclosures.

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