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Binocular vision symptoms alone may not influence concussion test results

Adam Peiffer, OD, MS
Adam Peiffer

SAN ANTONIO – Binocular vision symptoms alone did not significantly affect the standardized scores on the CogState Brief Battery in adolescents with sports-related concussion, according to research presented here at the American Academy of Optometry meeting.

Adam Peiffer, OD, MS, shared results of a study involving 52 subjects between 9 and 17 years old, at an academy-sponsored press conference. Thirty-four individuals who experienced a concussion an average of 9.5 days prior and 18 controls were evaluated.

According to Peiffer, 79.4% of the concussion group was found to have clinically significant binocular vision disorders and a mean convergence insufficiency symptom score of 19.97.

The scores for the attention and working memory components of the CogState test were significantly lower in the subjects in the concussion group who had binocular vision symptoms compared to those without, according to the study. In addition, those with concussion and binocular vision symptoms scored lower on processing and attention compared to controls with binocular vision symptoms.

The researchers concluded that while binocular vision symptoms are prevalent in adolescents with sports-related concussion, the presence of these symptoms in the absence of a concussion does not significantly influence the CogState scores.

However, the presence of binocular vision symptoms in those with concussion was found to be associated with significantly reduced scores in attention and working memory, which indicates that the combination of concussion and binocular vision symptoms affects neurocognitive test scores, according to the abstract.

“Pediatric concussions are on the rise, but most estimates are underestimated due to underreporting and underrecognition,” Peiffer said. “As optometrists, we provide a unique opportunity to assess the visual system after concussion. We may be able to provide a more targeted treatment, specifically in consideration of return-to-learn accommodations. – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Editor's note: This article has been updated to clarify this phrase, “…the presence of these symptoms alone does not significantly influence the CogState scores,” in this way, “…the presence of these symptoms in the absence of a concussion does not significantly influence the CogState scores.”

Disclosure: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

 

Adam Peiffer, OD, MS
Adam Peiffer

SAN ANTONIO – Binocular vision symptoms alone did not significantly affect the standardized scores on the CogState Brief Battery in adolescents with sports-related concussion, according to research presented here at the American Academy of Optometry meeting.

Adam Peiffer, OD, MS, shared results of a study involving 52 subjects between 9 and 17 years old, at an academy-sponsored press conference. Thirty-four individuals who experienced a concussion an average of 9.5 days prior and 18 controls were evaluated.

According to Peiffer, 79.4% of the concussion group was found to have clinically significant binocular vision disorders and a mean convergence insufficiency symptom score of 19.97.

The scores for the attention and working memory components of the CogState test were significantly lower in the subjects in the concussion group who had binocular vision symptoms compared to those without, according to the study. In addition, those with concussion and binocular vision symptoms scored lower on processing and attention compared to controls with binocular vision symptoms.

The researchers concluded that while binocular vision symptoms are prevalent in adolescents with sports-related concussion, the presence of these symptoms in the absence of a concussion does not significantly influence the CogState scores.

However, the presence of binocular vision symptoms in those with concussion was found to be associated with significantly reduced scores in attention and working memory, which indicates that the combination of concussion and binocular vision symptoms affects neurocognitive test scores, according to the abstract.

“Pediatric concussions are on the rise, but most estimates are underestimated due to underreporting and underrecognition,” Peiffer said. “As optometrists, we provide a unique opportunity to assess the visual system after concussion. We may be able to provide a more targeted treatment, specifically in consideration of return-to-learn accommodations. – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Editor's note: This article has been updated to clarify this phrase, “…the presence of these symptoms alone does not significantly influence the CogState scores,” in this way, “…the presence of these symptoms in the absence of a concussion does not significantly influence the CogState scores.”

Disclosure: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

 

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