NeuroVision receives $15 million to support Alzheimer’s test

NeuroVision Imaging Inc. has received $15 million, with an initial close of $11.2 million in a Series C financing round led by Wildcat Capital Management.

NeuroVision announced in a press release that it has created an experimental technology that measures retinal autofluorescence for amyloid beta plaque, which can accumulate in the retina, photoreceptor and nerve complex at the back of the eye.

Johnson & Johnson Innovation-JJDC Inc., Nikon-SBI Innovation Fund, Whittier Ventures LLC and VSP Global are also providing support in this round of financing in addition to Wildcat, according to the release.

Current tests, such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans and cerebrospinal fluid analysis, that can detect amyloid beta plaque in the brain are invasive, inconvenient and costly in the clinical trial setting as well as impractical for routine screening, monitoring and therapy response evaluation, the company stated. However, NeuroVision’s eye imaging system is a low-cost, noninvasive test that, “aims to assess a hallmark sign of Alzheimer’s disease – the accumulation of amyloid beta plaque in the brain.”

“We’re very pleased to announce this new round of financing and the confidence it represents from organizations dedicated to the development of innovative health care tools and solutions,” Steven Verdooner, CEO of NeuroVision, said in the release. “Each participant in this round represents potential future strategic opportunities for the company as we move toward commercialization.”

NeuroVision Imaging Inc. has received $15 million, with an initial close of $11.2 million in a Series C financing round led by Wildcat Capital Management.

NeuroVision announced in a press release that it has created an experimental technology that measures retinal autofluorescence for amyloid beta plaque, which can accumulate in the retina, photoreceptor and nerve complex at the back of the eye.

Johnson & Johnson Innovation-JJDC Inc., Nikon-SBI Innovation Fund, Whittier Ventures LLC and VSP Global are also providing support in this round of financing in addition to Wildcat, according to the release.

Current tests, such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans and cerebrospinal fluid analysis, that can detect amyloid beta plaque in the brain are invasive, inconvenient and costly in the clinical trial setting as well as impractical for routine screening, monitoring and therapy response evaluation, the company stated. However, NeuroVision’s eye imaging system is a low-cost, noninvasive test that, “aims to assess a hallmark sign of Alzheimer’s disease – the accumulation of amyloid beta plaque in the brain.”

“We’re very pleased to announce this new round of financing and the confidence it represents from organizations dedicated to the development of innovative health care tools and solutions,” Steven Verdooner, CEO of NeuroVision, said in the release. “Each participant in this round represents potential future strategic opportunities for the company as we move toward commercialization.”