AOA diabetes clinical guideline accepted by national clearinghouse

The American Optometric Association announced that its clinical practice guideline, Eye Care of the Patient With Diabetes Mellitus is now posted to the National Guideline Clearinghouse and publicly available for health care professionals, institutions and agencies.

Guidelines must meet strict standards to be accepted and must provide evidence-based recommendations or action plans for patient care, according to the AOA press release.

The National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) is managed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The AOA said because nearly one-third of U.S. adults are estimated to have diabetes by 2050, the 83-page guideline is a pertinent resource for optometrists.

The guideline includes the clinical breakdown of diabetes mellitus, prevention and diagnostic information, the press release said. In addition, it discusses identifying diabetes’ telltale symptoms, improving the quality of care for diabetes patients, educating patients and suggesting vision rehabilitation services.

There are is also a diabetes quick-reference guide for doctors. To view the guideline, click here.

The American Optometric Association announced that its clinical practice guideline, Eye Care of the Patient With Diabetes Mellitus is now posted to the National Guideline Clearinghouse and publicly available for health care professionals, institutions and agencies.

Guidelines must meet strict standards to be accepted and must provide evidence-based recommendations or action plans for patient care, according to the AOA press release.

The National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) is managed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The AOA said because nearly one-third of U.S. adults are estimated to have diabetes by 2050, the 83-page guideline is a pertinent resource for optometrists.

The guideline includes the clinical breakdown of diabetes mellitus, prevention and diagnostic information, the press release said. In addition, it discusses identifying diabetes’ telltale symptoms, improving the quality of care for diabetes patients, educating patients and suggesting vision rehabilitation services.

There are is also a diabetes quick-reference guide for doctors. To view the guideline, click here.