Meeting News Coverage

VSP: Tablets can boost patient experience, satisfaction

ATLANTA — A positive doctor experience alone may not be enough to achieve an overall positive office visit experience, and utilizing technology, such as a tablet, can be a small but impactful measure to improve other areas of the patient experience, according to a spokesperson for VSP Global.

“An iPad can be engaging, it can be time saving and it can be cost-effective,” VSP’s Stephanie Zellner said during a symposium here at SECO. “We are in a time where the patient’s experience has never been more important.”

One way in which a tablet could benefit a practice’s ability to deliver a good patient experience from start to finish is by giving the doctor and the staff the ability to never break contact with the patient, she said.

“For example, I went to Best Buy last week, and when I asked if a product was in stock, the person went to check and disappeared for upwards of 5 minutes,” Zellner said. “That doesn’t sound like a long time, but when you’re standing in the aisle with nothing to do, you begin to wonder: Did he forget about me? Where did he go? Why is it taking so long?”

“It’s not a good customer experience,” she said.

According to Zellner, 78% of people today research a practice before they visit, and 84% of those who research read and pay attention to the reviews.

As an example, Zellner presented an example of a practice that bore only a two-star rating out of five and one of the bad reviews associated with it.

“The reviewer said that they hated to give this office one star because the doctor experience was so great, but then it all fell apart. The selection was bad, the staff was underwhelming and it was bad review after bad review,” she said. “If 84% of people online are reading these reviews, this could be problematic for you.”

ATLANTA — A positive doctor experience alone may not be enough to achieve an overall positive office visit experience, and utilizing technology, such as a tablet, can be a small but impactful measure to improve other areas of the patient experience, according to a spokesperson for VSP Global.

“An iPad can be engaging, it can be time saving and it can be cost-effective,” VSP’s Stephanie Zellner said during a symposium here at SECO. “We are in a time where the patient’s experience has never been more important.”

One way in which a tablet could benefit a practice’s ability to deliver a good patient experience from start to finish is by giving the doctor and the staff the ability to never break contact with the patient, she said.

“For example, I went to Best Buy last week, and when I asked if a product was in stock, the person went to check and disappeared for upwards of 5 minutes,” Zellner said. “That doesn’t sound like a long time, but when you’re standing in the aisle with nothing to do, you begin to wonder: Did he forget about me? Where did he go? Why is it taking so long?”

“It’s not a good customer experience,” she said.

According to Zellner, 78% of people today research a practice before they visit, and 84% of those who research read and pay attention to the reviews.

As an example, Zellner presented an example of a practice that bore only a two-star rating out of five and one of the bad reviews associated with it.

“The reviewer said that they hated to give this office one star because the doctor experience was so great, but then it all fell apart. The selection was bad, the staff was underwhelming and it was bad review after bad review,” she said. “If 84% of people online are reading these reviews, this could be problematic for you.”

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