Meeting News

RightEye launches technology to treat functional vision issues

LAS VEGAS – RightEye introduced the fully commercialized version of EyeQ Trainer, an oculomotor exercise program, here at Vision Expo West.

When paired with the company’s suite of EyeQ Tests, it is a complete solution for addressing functional vision impairments, the company said in a press release.

RightEye chief marketing officer Daniel Heimlich told Primary Care Optometry News that the in-office EyeQ Tests would evaluate the patient’s pursuits, fixation and saccades. The doctor may choose to apply it to patients complaining of headache, eye tiredness and reading issues. The eye tracking test then assigns the patient a customized regimen of exercises to do at home.

The patient commitment is about 10 minutes to do three exercises a day once a day for 30 days, Heimlich said. The doctor has access to a dashboard to monitor the patient’s progress and participation. After 30 days, the patient would return to the office for re-testing.

Typically, 10% to 20% of a practice’s patients would be candidates, Heimlich told PCON.

“There should be three components to the comprehensive eye exam: refraction, eye health and eye function,” he said. “The tools didn’t exist before to test and treat eye function; now we have an easy solution.”

This technology can be easily incorporated into a primary care practice and is not just intended for vision therapy specialists, Heimlich noted.

The commercialized version of the EyeQ Trainer incorporates feedback from hundreds of doctors who participated in a year-long beta test of the product, the company said in the release.

Internal studies showed that patients using the EyeQ Trainer experienced an improvement of up to 17% in their functional vision measurements after 1 week of use, and 93% said they felt better, Heimlich said. – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO


Disclosure: Heimlich is employed by RightEye.

LAS VEGAS – RightEye introduced the fully commercialized version of EyeQ Trainer, an oculomotor exercise program, here at Vision Expo West.

When paired with the company’s suite of EyeQ Tests, it is a complete solution for addressing functional vision impairments, the company said in a press release.

RightEye chief marketing officer Daniel Heimlich told Primary Care Optometry News that the in-office EyeQ Tests would evaluate the patient’s pursuits, fixation and saccades. The doctor may choose to apply it to patients complaining of headache, eye tiredness and reading issues. The eye tracking test then assigns the patient a customized regimen of exercises to do at home.

The patient commitment is about 10 minutes to do three exercises a day once a day for 30 days, Heimlich said. The doctor has access to a dashboard to monitor the patient’s progress and participation. After 30 days, the patient would return to the office for re-testing.

Typically, 10% to 20% of a practice’s patients would be candidates, Heimlich told PCON.

“There should be three components to the comprehensive eye exam: refraction, eye health and eye function,” he said. “The tools didn’t exist before to test and treat eye function; now we have an easy solution.”

This technology can be easily incorporated into a primary care practice and is not just intended for vision therapy specialists, Heimlich noted.

The commercialized version of the EyeQ Trainer incorporates feedback from hundreds of doctors who participated in a year-long beta test of the product, the company said in the release.

Internal studies showed that patients using the EyeQ Trainer experienced an improvement of up to 17% in their functional vision measurements after 1 week of use, and 93% said they felt better, Heimlich said. – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO


Disclosure: Heimlich is employed by RightEye.

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