New smart glasses designed to aid patients with low vision

NuEyes and Osterhout Design Group announced the release of portable smart glasses for patients with low vision.

Osterhout Design Group (ODG) combined its R-7 smart glasses with NuEyes’ lenses and proprietary software to display altered camera feedback for individuals suffering from age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa and other visually impairing conditions, according to a press release from ODG.

The battery-powered smart glasses feature voice activation, 3D stereoscopic ultratransparent high-definition displays, high-speed wireless connectivity and high-performance positional sensors. The bridge includes a camera that captures a 1080p resolution and 60 frames per second image. The NuEyes technology that was added to the R-7 design allows for enhanced and enlarged images captured by the camera to then be projected inside the lenses.

“I have several patients who have been waiting for this technology for a long time,” Michael Samuel, MD, a retina specialist at the Retina Institute of California, said in the release. “Macular degeneration is the number one cause of blindness in this country, and patients that have end-stage macular degeneration are really the ones that are struggling the most. They’re the ones who are really looking for technology.”

The NuEyes smart glasses were honored as a winner at the recent Consumer Electronics Show 2016, during the CEA Foundation’s inaugural “technology that improves lives” video contest, according to the release. They are currently available through NuEyes.

NuEyes and Osterhout Design Group announced the release of portable smart glasses for patients with low vision.

Osterhout Design Group (ODG) combined its R-7 smart glasses with NuEyes’ lenses and proprietary software to display altered camera feedback for individuals suffering from age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa and other visually impairing conditions, according to a press release from ODG.

The battery-powered smart glasses feature voice activation, 3D stereoscopic ultratransparent high-definition displays, high-speed wireless connectivity and high-performance positional sensors. The bridge includes a camera that captures a 1080p resolution and 60 frames per second image. The NuEyes technology that was added to the R-7 design allows for enhanced and enlarged images captured by the camera to then be projected inside the lenses.

“I have several patients who have been waiting for this technology for a long time,” Michael Samuel, MD, a retina specialist at the Retina Institute of California, said in the release. “Macular degeneration is the number one cause of blindness in this country, and patients that have end-stage macular degeneration are really the ones that are struggling the most. They’re the ones who are really looking for technology.”

The NuEyes smart glasses were honored as a winner at the recent Consumer Electronics Show 2016, during the CEA Foundation’s inaugural “technology that improves lives” video contest, according to the release. They are currently available through NuEyes.