In the Journals

Modest change in dry eye symptoms with desktop humidifier

The desktop humidifier shows potential to improve tear film stability and subjective comfort during computer use, according to researchers.

Forty-four computer users (24 female, 20 male subjects) were enrolled in the prospective, masked, randomized crossover study where participants were required to engage in 1 hour of continuous computer use in the same air-conditioned clinic room on two subsequent visits.

One visit was randomized to exposure of the USB-powered desktop humidifier, and in the other visit the humidifier (Homi Ltd.) was turned off.

Researchers assessed lipid layer grade and the primary outcome measure, noninvasive tear-film break-up time, using the Tearscope Plus (Keeler).

On average, subjects reported 4.4 hours of computer use daily, and dry eye status was not severe, researchers reported.

The desktop humidifier facilitated an overall humidity change of +5.4% between the two environments.

No significant changes in lipid layer grade or tear meniscus height were observed over the 1-hour period in either group.

After exposure to the humidifier, noninvasive tear film break-up time improved, whereas a significant reduction in break-up measurements were observed without the humidifier.

The desktop humidifier resulted in a statistically significant difference in the median change of noninvasive tear film break-up time of +4.0 seconds.

Nearly half of the participants (48%) in the control arm (no humidifier) reported a reduction in subjective ocular comfort relative to baseline.

Disclosures: The authors reported no relevant financial disclosures.

The desktop humidifier shows potential to improve tear film stability and subjective comfort during computer use, according to researchers.

Forty-four computer users (24 female, 20 male subjects) were enrolled in the prospective, masked, randomized crossover study where participants were required to engage in 1 hour of continuous computer use in the same air-conditioned clinic room on two subsequent visits.

One visit was randomized to exposure of the USB-powered desktop humidifier, and in the other visit the humidifier (Homi Ltd.) was turned off.

Researchers assessed lipid layer grade and the primary outcome measure, noninvasive tear-film break-up time, using the Tearscope Plus (Keeler).

On average, subjects reported 4.4 hours of computer use daily, and dry eye status was not severe, researchers reported.

The desktop humidifier facilitated an overall humidity change of +5.4% between the two environments.

No significant changes in lipid layer grade or tear meniscus height were observed over the 1-hour period in either group.

After exposure to the humidifier, noninvasive tear film break-up time improved, whereas a significant reduction in break-up measurements were observed without the humidifier.

The desktop humidifier resulted in a statistically significant difference in the median change of noninvasive tear film break-up time of +4.0 seconds.

Nearly half of the participants (48%) in the control arm (no humidifier) reported a reduction in subjective ocular comfort relative to baseline.

Disclosures: The authors reported no relevant financial disclosures.