Meeting News Coverage

BioDOptix introduces amniotic tissue product in optometry

LAS VEGAS – BioDOptix is now marketing its extracellular membrane allograft to optometrists for treating ocular surface disorders, corneal epithelial defects, corneal ulcers, pterygia and keratopathy.

BioDOptix vice president of marketing, Darin S. Gerlach, told Primary Care Optometry News here at Vision Expo West that the company entered the ophthalmology market 3 years ago, and now optometrists are also seeing good clinical results with the product.

He said the process is vertically integrated: BioDOptix educates the donors, obtains full consent and recovers the tissue from healthy mothers during Cesarean deliveries.

“Less than 5% of potential donors decline to participate,” he said.

The product is indicated for “any anterior surface wound or ulcer, corneal abrasions, chemical burns, recurring ulcers,” Gerlach said. “Dry eye itself is not an indication, but an underlying cause may be.”

The tissue is applied to a slight wet eye, he said, and a bandage lens is placed on top to hold it in place.

“It incorporates or disintegrates in 5 to 7 days,” Gerlach said. “It is opaque, and vision will be obstructed.”

The product arrives at the practice dehydrated “to optimize the handling characteristics and maximize the retention of the growth factors, cytokines and collagens inherent in the amnion tissue,” according to company literature.”

Gerlach said the dehydrated tissue can be stored at room temperature and has a 5-year shelf life.

BioDOptix vice president of education and general manager Ken Watson told PCON that the tissue is avascular, “so your body doesn’t recognize it as another cell. It’s ‘regenerative medicine.’ It stimulates your body to heal itself.”

He said acceptance of the product among optometrists has been “exponential,” with reimbursement making a “big difference.” – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Disclosures: Gerlach and Watson are employed by BioDOptix.

LAS VEGAS – BioDOptix is now marketing its extracellular membrane allograft to optometrists for treating ocular surface disorders, corneal epithelial defects, corneal ulcers, pterygia and keratopathy.

BioDOptix vice president of marketing, Darin S. Gerlach, told Primary Care Optometry News here at Vision Expo West that the company entered the ophthalmology market 3 years ago, and now optometrists are also seeing good clinical results with the product.

He said the process is vertically integrated: BioDOptix educates the donors, obtains full consent and recovers the tissue from healthy mothers during Cesarean deliveries.

“Less than 5% of potential donors decline to participate,” he said.

The product is indicated for “any anterior surface wound or ulcer, corneal abrasions, chemical burns, recurring ulcers,” Gerlach said. “Dry eye itself is not an indication, but an underlying cause may be.”

The tissue is applied to a slight wet eye, he said, and a bandage lens is placed on top to hold it in place.

“It incorporates or disintegrates in 5 to 7 days,” Gerlach said. “It is opaque, and vision will be obstructed.”

The product arrives at the practice dehydrated “to optimize the handling characteristics and maximize the retention of the growth factors, cytokines and collagens inherent in the amnion tissue,” according to company literature.”

Gerlach said the dehydrated tissue can be stored at room temperature and has a 5-year shelf life.

BioDOptix vice president of education and general manager Ken Watson told PCON that the tissue is avascular, “so your body doesn’t recognize it as another cell. It’s ‘regenerative medicine.’ It stimulates your body to heal itself.”

He said acceptance of the product among optometrists has been “exponential,” with reimbursement making a “big difference.” – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Disclosures: Gerlach and Watson are employed by BioDOptix.

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