Awards for excellence in ophthalmic research announced at ARVO

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Two well-known vision researchers received awards for excellence in ophthalmic research here at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

Henry F. Edelhauser, PhD, received the Proctor Medal for his lifelong contributions to research on the corneal endothelium. C. Stephen Foster, MD, was given the Weisenfeld Award for his work in ocular inflammatory diseases.

Dr. Edelhauser’s work has shown that the corneal endothelium is permeable and contains metabolic pumps that maintain the health of the cornea, it was noted in a ceremony. His observations showed that when the corneal endothelium is damaged, the cornea becomes edematous. Dr. Edelhauser is also credited with first demonstrating corneal toxicity from viscoelastic and detergents used in surgery.

Dr. Foster has spent the past 18 years researching mucous membrane pemphigoid. The ocular manifestations of the disease include inflammation and foreshortening of the fornix, which could take 15 to 20 years to develop, he said in accepting his award.

He stressed that his work is not done, however. Eventually, he wants to develop a blood test for pemphigoid to obviate the need for biopsy, he said.

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Two well-known vision researchers received awards for excellence in ophthalmic research here at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

Henry F. Edelhauser, PhD, received the Proctor Medal for his lifelong contributions to research on the corneal endothelium. C. Stephen Foster, MD, was given the Weisenfeld Award for his work in ocular inflammatory diseases.

Dr. Edelhauser’s work has shown that the corneal endothelium is permeable and contains metabolic pumps that maintain the health of the cornea, it was noted in a ceremony. His observations showed that when the corneal endothelium is damaged, the cornea becomes edematous. Dr. Edelhauser is also credited with first demonstrating corneal toxicity from viscoelastic and detergents used in surgery.

Dr. Foster has spent the past 18 years researching mucous membrane pemphigoid. The ocular manifestations of the disease include inflammation and foreshortening of the fornix, which could take 15 to 20 years to develop, he said in accepting his award.

He stressed that his work is not done, however. Eventually, he wants to develop a blood test for pemphigoid to obviate the need for biopsy, he said.