Meeting News

Query patients on makeup application, removal habits

A recent survey found that respondents who did not report using an eye makeup remover had higher Standardized Patient Evaluation of Eye Dryness scores than those who used makeup removers, according to research presented at the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting.

A total of 253 females responded to the survey, with a mean age of 41.67 years. Approximately 40% were contact lens wearers.

The average Standardized Patient Evaluation of Eye Dryness (SPEED) survey score was 8.19 +/- 5.18, and the average University of North Caroline Dry Eye Management Scale score was 3.28 +/-2.32.

Respondents reported wearing makeup an average of 4.99 days per week. and makeup was removed an average of 4.68 days per week.

Those who did not report using an eye makeup remover had higher SPEED scores, with a mean of 10.5, than those who did use eye makeup removers, at 7.6.

They also noted that contact lens wearers had more vision fluctuations after makeup removal than those who do not wear contacts.

“Daily removal of cosmetics improved symptoms; however, there are many ocular surface offending chemicals used in these products that need further investigation, Leslie O’Dell, OD, said in an interview with Primary Care Optometry News. “More research is needed to explore the relationship between cosmetic use and ocular surface disease for both contact lens wearing and non-contact lens wearing patients.” – by Abigail Sutton

Reference:

O’Dell LE, et al. An evaluation of cosmetic wear habits correlated to ocular surface disease symptoms. Presented at: Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting; May 7-11, 2017; Baltimore.

Disclosure: The researchers report no financial disclosures.

A recent survey found that respondents who did not report using an eye makeup remover had higher Standardized Patient Evaluation of Eye Dryness scores than those who used makeup removers, according to research presented at the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting.

A total of 253 females responded to the survey, with a mean age of 41.67 years. Approximately 40% were contact lens wearers.

The average Standardized Patient Evaluation of Eye Dryness (SPEED) survey score was 8.19 +/- 5.18, and the average University of North Caroline Dry Eye Management Scale score was 3.28 +/-2.32.

Respondents reported wearing makeup an average of 4.99 days per week. and makeup was removed an average of 4.68 days per week.

Those who did not report using an eye makeup remover had higher SPEED scores, with a mean of 10.5, than those who did use eye makeup removers, at 7.6.

They also noted that contact lens wearers had more vision fluctuations after makeup removal than those who do not wear contacts.

“Daily removal of cosmetics improved symptoms; however, there are many ocular surface offending chemicals used in these products that need further investigation, Leslie O’Dell, OD, said in an interview with Primary Care Optometry News. “More research is needed to explore the relationship between cosmetic use and ocular surface disease for both contact lens wearing and non-contact lens wearing patients.” – by Abigail Sutton

Reference:

O’Dell LE, et al. An evaluation of cosmetic wear habits correlated to ocular surface disease symptoms. Presented at: Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting; May 7-11, 2017; Baltimore.

Disclosure: The researchers report no financial disclosures.