Fight for Sight to provide research funding for keratoconus study

Fight for Sight, which funds eye research, announced its support of an investigation at Nottingham University into the causes of keratoconus.

“Keratoconus affects thousands of people across the country, which has a profound impact on their day-to-day life,” Neil Ebenezer, director of research, policy and innovation at Fight for Sight, said in a press release. “Our research will help to find answers to the questions around this condition and ultimately lead to treatments that could transform people’s lives.”

Mouhamed Al-Aqaba , MBChB, PhD, and his team of researchers at Nottingham University will take corneal samples from keratoconus patients and use biomarkers to investigate the underlying nerve structures.

“We’re building on previous research that shows the nerves have a role to play in this condition, but exactly how and why still needs to be determined,” Al-Aqaba said in the release. “Our research will help us to understand more about how this disease progresses and how we can tackle it.”

According to the organization’s press release, keratoconus effects between one in 375 and one in 1,750.

Fight for Sight, which funds eye research, announced its support of an investigation at Nottingham University into the causes of keratoconus.

“Keratoconus affects thousands of people across the country, which has a profound impact on their day-to-day life,” Neil Ebenezer, director of research, policy and innovation at Fight for Sight, said in a press release. “Our research will help to find answers to the questions around this condition and ultimately lead to treatments that could transform people’s lives.”

Mouhamed Al-Aqaba , MBChB, PhD, and his team of researchers at Nottingham University will take corneal samples from keratoconus patients and use biomarkers to investigate the underlying nerve structures.

“We’re building on previous research that shows the nerves have a role to play in this condition, but exactly how and why still needs to be determined,” Al-Aqaba said in the release. “Our research will help us to understand more about how this disease progresses and how we can tackle it.”

According to the organization’s press release, keratoconus effects between one in 375 and one in 1,750.