Meeting News

Neurolens introduces test, spectacles to relieve headaches, eye strain

LAS VEGAS – Neurolens announced the availability of spectacle lenses that contain contoured prism to relieve headaches, neck and shoulder pain, and eye strain related to the use of digital devices, reading or detail work.

Neurolens CEO Davis Corley explained to Primary Care Optometry News here at Vision Expo West that the company began working with neurologists 6 years ago to evaluate patients with chronic headaches.

In a study involving 180 patients and seven neurologists, patients were first evaluated with the Neurolens Measurement Device, Corley said, then received glasses containing contour prism.

Eighty-two percent of the patients responded positively to the prism, Corley said. Half had no more or dramatically reduced incidence of headache.

When the eyes are not aligned, the visual system must work constantly to compensate for the misalignment, the company said in a press release. This stresses the trigeminal nerve, which is responsible for head and neck sensations.

Jeffrey P. Krall, OD, co-inventor of the technology, told PCON, “We’ve missed a portion of care. Now we have a way to relieve headache and neck tension. Neurology now realizes optometry has the keys to solving some headache problems.”

“Eye misalignment is being exacerbated by near needs,” Corley told PCON. “Jeff found a way to measure and treat it.”

The Neurolens Measurement Device runs a 3-minute test where patients focus on a single point while a dynamic display of rotating planets and stars activate peripheral and central vision to measure distance and near alignment, according to the press release. The unique measurements, calculated to 1/100th of a prism diopter, result in a prescription range for the Neurolens contoured prism lens design, which provides eye alignment at all distances by gradually increasing the prism from distance to near.

The technology is being used in 27 states, Corley said, and the company has plans to double that by the beginning of the year.

Optometrists can purchase the Neurolens Measurement Device and receive training and order lenses through Neurolens. – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Disclosures: Corley is employed by Neurolens. Krall is co-inventor of the technology.

LAS VEGAS – Neurolens announced the availability of spectacle lenses that contain contoured prism to relieve headaches, neck and shoulder pain, and eye strain related to the use of digital devices, reading or detail work.

Neurolens CEO Davis Corley explained to Primary Care Optometry News here at Vision Expo West that the company began working with neurologists 6 years ago to evaluate patients with chronic headaches.

In a study involving 180 patients and seven neurologists, patients were first evaluated with the Neurolens Measurement Device, Corley said, then received glasses containing contour prism.

Eighty-two percent of the patients responded positively to the prism, Corley said. Half had no more or dramatically reduced incidence of headache.

When the eyes are not aligned, the visual system must work constantly to compensate for the misalignment, the company said in a press release. This stresses the trigeminal nerve, which is responsible for head and neck sensations.

Jeffrey P. Krall, OD, co-inventor of the technology, told PCON, “We’ve missed a portion of care. Now we have a way to relieve headache and neck tension. Neurology now realizes optometry has the keys to solving some headache problems.”

“Eye misalignment is being exacerbated by near needs,” Corley told PCON. “Jeff found a way to measure and treat it.”

The Neurolens Measurement Device runs a 3-minute test where patients focus on a single point while a dynamic display of rotating planets and stars activate peripheral and central vision to measure distance and near alignment, according to the press release. The unique measurements, calculated to 1/100th of a prism diopter, result in a prescription range for the Neurolens contoured prism lens design, which provides eye alignment at all distances by gradually increasing the prism from distance to near.

The technology is being used in 27 states, Corley said, and the company has plans to double that by the beginning of the year.

Optometrists can purchase the Neurolens Measurement Device and receive training and order lenses through Neurolens. – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Disclosures: Corley is employed by Neurolens. Krall is co-inventor of the technology.

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