In the Journals

Study identifies numerous factors affecting contact lens comfort

Researchers found that excessive lens movement, inferior lens decentration, poor surface wettability and deposits, inferior corneal staining and Asian ethnicity were associated with discomfort and dryness in silicone hydrogel wearers.

Truong and colleagues, in a study published in Optometry and Vision Science, evaluated 4,164 records of 220 subjects wearing comfilcon A or enfilcon A silicone hydrogel contact lenses in 46 different studies. Lens fit and performance and subjective comfort and dryness were assessed at insertion and after 3 and 6 hours of wear, the study abstract said.

The patients’ ocular surface health was assessed at the slit lamp using fluorescein after 6 hours of wear.

The researchers reported that decreased comfort and dryness at 3 hours was associated with excessive lens movement, front surface deposits, poor wettability and Asian ethnicity. At 6 hours, greater lens movement, Asian ethnicity and inferior corneal staining were factors associated with decreased comfort and dryness. Dryness was also found to be associated with inferior lens decentration at 6 hours.

“Clinicians should consider all these factors to achieve the most comfortable and successful contact lens fit,” Truong and colleagues concluded.

Researchers found that excessive lens movement, inferior lens decentration, poor surface wettability and deposits, inferior corneal staining and Asian ethnicity were associated with discomfort and dryness in silicone hydrogel wearers.

Truong and colleagues, in a study published in Optometry and Vision Science, evaluated 4,164 records of 220 subjects wearing comfilcon A or enfilcon A silicone hydrogel contact lenses in 46 different studies. Lens fit and performance and subjective comfort and dryness were assessed at insertion and after 3 and 6 hours of wear, the study abstract said.

The patients’ ocular surface health was assessed at the slit lamp using fluorescein after 6 hours of wear.

The researchers reported that decreased comfort and dryness at 3 hours was associated with excessive lens movement, front surface deposits, poor wettability and Asian ethnicity. At 6 hours, greater lens movement, Asian ethnicity and inferior corneal staining were factors associated with decreased comfort and dryness. Dryness was also found to be associated with inferior lens decentration at 6 hours.

“Clinicians should consider all these factors to achieve the most comfortable and successful contact lens fit,” Truong and colleagues concluded.