Meeting News Coverage

CooperVision searches for best practices, current honorees offer advice

LAS VEGAS – CooperVision announced its second annual search for U.S. practitioners “who have found unique ways to make their businesses thrive and can share a refreshing perspective with the entire profession,” the company said in a press release.

“Best practices is about bringing to light the innovative things that eye care practitioners do every day to grow their practices and provide the best possible care to their patients,” Michele Andrews, OD, director of professional affairs, North America, CooperVision, said in the release.

CooperVision gathered some of its current “best practices” at a media event here at Vision Expo West to describe strategies they implement for success.

Ami Ranani, OD, of Somers, N.Y., said he purchases the latest technology.

“We see 35 to 40 patients per day and book every 15 minutes,” he said. “We worry about online refraction. If you keep up with technology and you have a good look in your office, you can make millions in this field.”

Mark Perry, OD, who practices with this wife, Karen Perry, OD, FAAO, in Orlando, Fla., said, “We show patients all test results. It provides a ‘wow’ factor.”

He said the practice runs the Optomap (Optos) on every patient for a nominal charge, with a 95% acceptance rate.

“It helps us provide the best care to everyone,” Karen Perry said.

Ranani said his practice is in the process of disposing of the magazines in the waiting room and installing iPads so patients can go to the practice’s “eye store.”

“Patients like to order contact lenses at 5 p.m. on Sunday,” and can do so using the online eye store. “Lens Ferry has a great program, too. The convenience is more important than the financial savings to my patients,” he said.

Ranani said they also make a practice of always dispensing the newest contact lenses.

Steven Wilson, OD, of Valdosta, Ga., said his practice provides iPads to patients that link to an online optical where they can choose frame and lens options.

Samuel Teske, OD, of Tampa, Fla., said he differentiates his practice by offering scleral lenses, corneal reshaping therapy and orthokeratology.

James Vann, OD, of Fulton, Mo., offers the “Blindness Prevention Program” to patients.

“It includes the Optomap, a nutritional scan and the ClearPath (Freedom Meditech), and I review those results with patients.”

Vann said he recently became a Certified Diabetes Educator, and now patients call him with questions regarding nutrition.

“A better educated patient is more loyal,” he said.

A happy, satisfied staff is also important to many of these practices.

“I want my employees to enjoy coming to work,” Mark Perry said. “During an interview, existing employees sit in to help determine if the candidate will fit into the practice.”

“I like to focus on the patient experience,” Vann said. “Many have tried Wal-Mart and online and have come back to us, and it all starts with the staff.

“We have heart, we say,” he continued. “Technology is great, but patients don’t know what you’re doing unless you tell them. I go over the treatment plan with patients, including glasses. I discuss dealing with glare and distortion, then I hand them over to the technician. They don’t get this at Wal-Mart or online. In our community, the patient experience means everything. When they get their eye wear they know it was prescribed based on clinical findings.” – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Disclosures: Andrews is director of professional affairs for CooperVision. Karen Perry, Mark Perry, Ranani, Teske, Vann and Wilson, were all named “Best Practices” by CooperVision.

LAS VEGAS – CooperVision announced its second annual search for U.S. practitioners “who have found unique ways to make their businesses thrive and can share a refreshing perspective with the entire profession,” the company said in a press release.

“Best practices is about bringing to light the innovative things that eye care practitioners do every day to grow their practices and provide the best possible care to their patients,” Michele Andrews, OD, director of professional affairs, North America, CooperVision, said in the release.

CooperVision gathered some of its current “best practices” at a media event here at Vision Expo West to describe strategies they implement for success.

Ami Ranani, OD, of Somers, N.Y., said he purchases the latest technology.

“We see 35 to 40 patients per day and book every 15 minutes,” he said. “We worry about online refraction. If you keep up with technology and you have a good look in your office, you can make millions in this field.”

Mark Perry, OD, who practices with this wife, Karen Perry, OD, FAAO, in Orlando, Fla., said, “We show patients all test results. It provides a ‘wow’ factor.”

He said the practice runs the Optomap (Optos) on every patient for a nominal charge, with a 95% acceptance rate.

“It helps us provide the best care to everyone,” Karen Perry said.

Ranani said his practice is in the process of disposing of the magazines in the waiting room and installing iPads so patients can go to the practice’s “eye store.”

“Patients like to order contact lenses at 5 p.m. on Sunday,” and can do so using the online eye store. “Lens Ferry has a great program, too. The convenience is more important than the financial savings to my patients,” he said.

Ranani said they also make a practice of always dispensing the newest contact lenses.

Steven Wilson, OD, of Valdosta, Ga., said his practice provides iPads to patients that link to an online optical where they can choose frame and lens options.

Samuel Teske, OD, of Tampa, Fla., said he differentiates his practice by offering scleral lenses, corneal reshaping therapy and orthokeratology.

James Vann, OD, of Fulton, Mo., offers the “Blindness Prevention Program” to patients.

“It includes the Optomap, a nutritional scan and the ClearPath (Freedom Meditech), and I review those results with patients.”

Vann said he recently became a Certified Diabetes Educator, and now patients call him with questions regarding nutrition.

“A better educated patient is more loyal,” he said.

A happy, satisfied staff is also important to many of these practices.

“I want my employees to enjoy coming to work,” Mark Perry said. “During an interview, existing employees sit in to help determine if the candidate will fit into the practice.”

“I like to focus on the patient experience,” Vann said. “Many have tried Wal-Mart and online and have come back to us, and it all starts with the staff.

“We have heart, we say,” he continued. “Technology is great, but patients don’t know what you’re doing unless you tell them. I go over the treatment plan with patients, including glasses. I discuss dealing with glare and distortion, then I hand them over to the technician. They don’t get this at Wal-Mart or online. In our community, the patient experience means everything. When they get their eye wear they know it was prescribed based on clinical findings.” – by Nancy Hemphill, ELS, FAAO

Disclosures: Andrews is director of professional affairs for CooperVision. Karen Perry, Mark Perry, Ranani, Teske, Vann and Wilson, were all named “Best Practices” by CooperVision.

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