Only 14% of global contact lens wearers discuss digital device screen time with ECPs

CooperVision’s Digital Device Usage and Your Eyes report revealed substantial opportunities for improved eye care provider and patient engagement.

Consumers from around the world shared expectations and experiences about digital device use, digital eye fatigue and health habits, according to a press release from the company.

The multifaceted survey was conducted among thousands of respondents in Australia, France, Germany, Spain, the U.K. and the U.S.

CooperVision found that both contact lens wearers and non-wearers worry about how much they use digital devices. Globally, 19% of people who use vision correction and 18% of people who do not are concerned about the amount of time spent looking at screens. For contact lens wearers, 26% express concern.

“While there’s widespread interest by patients in discussing digital device use with their eye care professional, that’s not happening in large part,” Gary Osborn, OD, MS, FAAO, FBCLVA, vice president, global professional and clinical affairs, CooperVision, said in the release. “Bridging this conversation gap is a substantial opportunity for eye care providers, helping them provide better care while remaining even more relevant in the lives of their patients as device use skyrockets.”

Only 14% of global contact lens wearers reported they had spoken with an eye care provider (ECP) regarding digital device use. Seventy-eight percent said they would be very or somewhat interested in exploring ways to reduce eye tiredness with their ECP.

The report also highlights how respondents cope with the ocular discomfort from digital device use, which phrases they use to describe how their eyes feel after screen viewing, and similarities and differences among consumers depending on where they live.

A follow-up survey in six countries revealed that nearly three in four contact lens wearers are willing to pay a premium for an option that reduces symptoms of digital eye fatigue, they added.

CooperVision’s Digital Device Usage and Your Eyes report revealed substantial opportunities for improved eye care provider and patient engagement.

Consumers from around the world shared expectations and experiences about digital device use, digital eye fatigue and health habits, according to a press release from the company.

The multifaceted survey was conducted among thousands of respondents in Australia, France, Germany, Spain, the U.K. and the U.S.

CooperVision found that both contact lens wearers and non-wearers worry about how much they use digital devices. Globally, 19% of people who use vision correction and 18% of people who do not are concerned about the amount of time spent looking at screens. For contact lens wearers, 26% express concern.

“While there’s widespread interest by patients in discussing digital device use with their eye care professional, that’s not happening in large part,” Gary Osborn, OD, MS, FAAO, FBCLVA, vice president, global professional and clinical affairs, CooperVision, said in the release. “Bridging this conversation gap is a substantial opportunity for eye care providers, helping them provide better care while remaining even more relevant in the lives of their patients as device use skyrockets.”

Only 14% of global contact lens wearers reported they had spoken with an eye care provider (ECP) regarding digital device use. Seventy-eight percent said they would be very or somewhat interested in exploring ways to reduce eye tiredness with their ECP.

The report also highlights how respondents cope with the ocular discomfort from digital device use, which phrases they use to describe how their eyes feel after screen viewing, and similarities and differences among consumers depending on where they live.

A follow-up survey in six countries revealed that nearly three in four contact lens wearers are willing to pay a premium for an option that reduces symptoms of digital eye fatigue, they added.