NAD recommends B+L discontinue certain claims for Ultra lenses

The National Advertising Division determined that Bausch + Lomb can support advertising claims that indicate the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone, which attracts and maintains moisture, in its Ultra contact lenses with MoistureSeal technology.

However, the group recommended in a press release that B+L discontinue claims that Ultra lenses contain “four times more PVP” than lenses from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care.

The National Advertising Division (NAD) also recommended that B+L discontinue the claim that Ultra lenses have, “best-in-class properties for best-in-class performance,” and certain other comparative performance and preference claims, according to the press release.

The NAD noted factual information in a B+L print advertisement’s chart was accurate and targeted to eye care professionals who could interpret the data.

In light of these recommendations, Kristy Marks, senior manager, communications, for Bausch + Lomb, told Primary Care Optometry News that, “Bausch + Lomb thanks the NAD for its careful review and finding that the ‘large breadth of analyses’ submitted by the company show that PVP is present in its Bausch + Lomb Ultra contact lenses, that the chart comparing the physical lens properties of various lens manufacturers is accurate and truthful, and that eye care professionals will understand the significance of that data.”

The NAD reported that they did not find significant evidence to support the claim that Bausch + Lomb’s Ultra lenses have “significantly more PVP (four times as much of the wetting agent) than [Acuvue Oasys lenses].”

Further, the NAD found that the advertiser’s “refit” study methodology was materially flawed and the study results were insufficiently reliable to support B+L’s comparative performance and preference claims, according to the release.

Bausch + Lomb, in its advertiser’s statement, said the company would comply with NAD’s recommendations, according to the NAD press release.

Marks continued, “We also appreciate NAD’s finding that “refit” studies are regularly used in the contact lens industry and that they can be quite valuable to contact lens manufacturers in developing and marketing their products. However, the NAD has noted certain limitations in regard to elements of Bausch + Lomb’s study methodology, and, therefore, Bausch + Lomb will, of course, take these findings and recommendations into consideration for future advertising and product claims.”

“We are pleased with the NAD’s decision and its careful consideration of our request for their review,” according to a Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman. “We appreciate B+L’s voluntary commitment to comply with the NAD’s recommendations.” – by Abigail Sutton

The National Advertising Division determined that Bausch + Lomb can support advertising claims that indicate the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone, which attracts and maintains moisture, in its Ultra contact lenses with MoistureSeal technology.

However, the group recommended in a press release that B+L discontinue claims that Ultra lenses contain “four times more PVP” than lenses from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care.

The National Advertising Division (NAD) also recommended that B+L discontinue the claim that Ultra lenses have, “best-in-class properties for best-in-class performance,” and certain other comparative performance and preference claims, according to the press release.

The NAD noted factual information in a B+L print advertisement’s chart was accurate and targeted to eye care professionals who could interpret the data.

In light of these recommendations, Kristy Marks, senior manager, communications, for Bausch + Lomb, told Primary Care Optometry News that, “Bausch + Lomb thanks the NAD for its careful review and finding that the ‘large breadth of analyses’ submitted by the company show that PVP is present in its Bausch + Lomb Ultra contact lenses, that the chart comparing the physical lens properties of various lens manufacturers is accurate and truthful, and that eye care professionals will understand the significance of that data.”

The NAD reported that they did not find significant evidence to support the claim that Bausch + Lomb’s Ultra lenses have “significantly more PVP (four times as much of the wetting agent) than [Acuvue Oasys lenses].”

Further, the NAD found that the advertiser’s “refit” study methodology was materially flawed and the study results were insufficiently reliable to support B+L’s comparative performance and preference claims, according to the release.

Bausch + Lomb, in its advertiser’s statement, said the company would comply with NAD’s recommendations, according to the NAD press release.

Marks continued, “We also appreciate NAD’s finding that “refit” studies are regularly used in the contact lens industry and that they can be quite valuable to contact lens manufacturers in developing and marketing their products. However, the NAD has noted certain limitations in regard to elements of Bausch + Lomb’s study methodology, and, therefore, Bausch + Lomb will, of course, take these findings and recommendations into consideration for future advertising and product claims.”

“We are pleased with the NAD’s decision and its careful consideration of our request for their review,” according to a Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman. “We appreciate B+L’s voluntary commitment to comply with the NAD’s recommendations.” – by Abigail Sutton