Light Polymers, Liquid Polarized to collaborate on sunglass technology

Light Polymers’ polarizing film wafers will now be used in eye wear products from Liquid Polarized as a result of an agreement between the two companies.

The collaboration allows Light Polymers to advance lyotropic liquid crystal technology while providing wearers with greater color choice in polarized sunglasses, according to a press release from the company.

Light Polymers explained in the release that most polarized eye wear lenses use a PVA-based polarizing film that is limited to shades of gray or brown and can weaken over time due to UV exposure. The polarizing film from Light Polymers uses lyotropic liquid crystals and is much thinner than PVA-based technology, providing greater UV stability.

“Light Polymers’ polarizing film is bringing much-needed innovation to the industry by introducing color polarizers, providing an alternative to traditional PVA-based technology,” Liquid Polarized founder Ken Wilson said in the release.

“Over 200 million pairs of sunglasses will be made and sold next year, consuming over 2 million square meters of film,” Light Polymers CEO Marc McConnaughey said in the release. “That’s a $60 million market potential for Light Polymers.”

Production is scheduled to begin this fall, according to the release.

Lyotropic liquid crystals are also used in LCD and OLED flat panel displays and LED lighting, Light Polymers noted in the release.

Light Polymers’ polarizing film wafers will now be used in eye wear products from Liquid Polarized as a result of an agreement between the two companies.

The collaboration allows Light Polymers to advance lyotropic liquid crystal technology while providing wearers with greater color choice in polarized sunglasses, according to a press release from the company.

Light Polymers explained in the release that most polarized eye wear lenses use a PVA-based polarizing film that is limited to shades of gray or brown and can weaken over time due to UV exposure. The polarizing film from Light Polymers uses lyotropic liquid crystals and is much thinner than PVA-based technology, providing greater UV stability.

“Light Polymers’ polarizing film is bringing much-needed innovation to the industry by introducing color polarizers, providing an alternative to traditional PVA-based technology,” Liquid Polarized founder Ken Wilson said in the release.

“Over 200 million pairs of sunglasses will be made and sold next year, consuming over 2 million square meters of film,” Light Polymers CEO Marc McConnaughey said in the release. “That’s a $60 million market potential for Light Polymers.”

Production is scheduled to begin this fall, according to the release.

Lyotropic liquid crystals are also used in LCD and OLED flat panel displays and LED lighting, Light Polymers noted in the release.