Orbital fracture after gunshot injury associated with poor visual outcomes

Matthew A. De Niear
Matthew A. De Niear

SAN FRANCISCO — Orbital fracture associated with gunshot injury in children younger than 18 years was associated with poor visual outcomes, according to a poster presented at the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery meeting.

“Many pediatric gunshot wounds in and around the eye are accidents. This emphasizes how gun safety is a public health issue for ophthalmologists because of the potentially devastating effects these injuries can have on young children’s vision,” first author Matthew A. De Niear, MD, PhD, told Healio/OSN.

De Niear and colleagues sought to examine the patterns, characteristics and sequelae of pediatric gunshot injuries to the orbit, ocular adnexa and eye.

In a retrospective chart review of 15 pediatric patients with gunshot injury involving ocular or orbital adnexa who were treated at a tertiary care center between 2006 and 2017, five unilateral open globe injuries were reported, all of which were associated with orbital fracture.

Last known visual acuity could be reliably measured in only 16 eyes of eight patients at varying final follow-up from 8 to 153 weeks. The remainder of patients were lost to follow-up or deceased. Last known visual acuity was 20/200 or better in six of those eyes, and all six had associated orbital fractures, a statistically significant association between visual acuity and orbital fracture (P = .031). – by Patricia Nale, ELS

Reference:

De Niear MA, et al. An analysis of pediatric orbital and ocular gunshot injuries. Presented at: American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery meeting; Oct. 10-11, 2019; San Francisco.

Disclosure: De Niear reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Matthew A. De Niear
Matthew A. De Niear

SAN FRANCISCO — Orbital fracture associated with gunshot injury in children younger than 18 years was associated with poor visual outcomes, according to a poster presented at the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery meeting.

“Many pediatric gunshot wounds in and around the eye are accidents. This emphasizes how gun safety is a public health issue for ophthalmologists because of the potentially devastating effects these injuries can have on young children’s vision,” first author Matthew A. De Niear, MD, PhD, told Healio/OSN.

De Niear and colleagues sought to examine the patterns, characteristics and sequelae of pediatric gunshot injuries to the orbit, ocular adnexa and eye.

In a retrospective chart review of 15 pediatric patients with gunshot injury involving ocular or orbital adnexa who were treated at a tertiary care center between 2006 and 2017, five unilateral open globe injuries were reported, all of which were associated with orbital fracture.

Last known visual acuity could be reliably measured in only 16 eyes of eight patients at varying final follow-up from 8 to 153 weeks. The remainder of patients were lost to follow-up or deceased. Last known visual acuity was 20/200 or better in six of those eyes, and all six had associated orbital fractures, a statistically significant association between visual acuity and orbital fracture (P = .031). – by Patricia Nale, ELS

Reference:

De Niear MA, et al. An analysis of pediatric orbital and ocular gunshot injuries. Presented at: American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery meeting; Oct. 10-11, 2019; San Francisco.

Disclosure: De Niear reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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