In the Journals

Laser-induced chorioretinal anastomosis can lessen CRVO treatment burden

Adding laser-induced chorioretinal anastomosis to anti-VEGF treatment for central retinal vein occlusion can reduce the number of injections needed, according to a study.

A randomized clinical trial included 58 patients with macular edema caused by CRVO who received monthly 0.5 mg Lucentis (ranibizumab, Genentech) intravitreal injections and were randomly assigned 1:1 to undergo either a laser-induced chorioretinal anastomosis procedure in addition to anti-VEGF or a sham procedure.

From month 7 to 13, the mean number of ranibizumab injections in the combination group was 1.5 compared with 2.4 in the ranibizumab-alone group. From month 13 to 24, the mean number of injections in the combination group was 1.7 compared with 4.6 in the ranibizumab-alone group. From month 7 to 24, the mean number of injections in the combination group was 3.2 compared with 7.1 in the ranibizumab-alone group.

At the final follow-up of 24 months, the mean change in best corrected visual acuity for both groups was an improvement of 16 ETDRS letters from month 1.

“This study demonstrated that in participants with a CRVO, creating an anastomotic connection between a retinal vein and a choroidal vein as a means of bypassing the obstruction to venous outflow significantly reduced the requirement for intravitreal ranibizumab injections over 2 years,” the researchers wrote. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: McAllister reports he has served on the advisory board for Bayer Switzerland and Novartis. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

 

Adding laser-induced chorioretinal anastomosis to anti-VEGF treatment for central retinal vein occlusion can reduce the number of injections needed, according to a study.

A randomized clinical trial included 58 patients with macular edema caused by CRVO who received monthly 0.5 mg Lucentis (ranibizumab, Genentech) intravitreal injections and were randomly assigned 1:1 to undergo either a laser-induced chorioretinal anastomosis procedure in addition to anti-VEGF or a sham procedure.

From month 7 to 13, the mean number of ranibizumab injections in the combination group was 1.5 compared with 2.4 in the ranibizumab-alone group. From month 13 to 24, the mean number of injections in the combination group was 1.7 compared with 4.6 in the ranibizumab-alone group. From month 7 to 24, the mean number of injections in the combination group was 3.2 compared with 7.1 in the ranibizumab-alone group.

At the final follow-up of 24 months, the mean change in best corrected visual acuity for both groups was an improvement of 16 ETDRS letters from month 1.

“This study demonstrated that in participants with a CRVO, creating an anastomotic connection between a retinal vein and a choroidal vein as a means of bypassing the obstruction to venous outflow significantly reduced the requirement for intravitreal ranibizumab injections over 2 years,” the researchers wrote. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: McAllister reports he has served on the advisory board for Bayer Switzerland and Novartis. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.