In the Journals

Vitreoretinal patients safely seen on postop day 2

Patients who undergo vitreoretinal surgery can be examined on the second postoperative day without negative effects in order to allow a more convenient patient care, according to a study.

A retrospective review of 134 patients who underwent vitreoretinal surgery found second day postoperative examinations to be just as effective as first day examinations in diagnosing postoperative complications.

Each patient received a phone call from a technician on the first day after surgery to assess pain and vision. In only one case did the patient’s report of severe pain necessitate a first day examination. The remaining patients were seen on postoperative day 2.

Mean preoperative IOP was 15 mm Hg (range, 5 mm Hg to 39 mm Hg), and mean postoperative day 2 IOP was 16 mm Hg (range, 4 mm Hg to 57 mm Hg). Pressure was normalized with medical treatment in the six patients whose postoperative day 2 IOP was greater than 30 mm Hg. There were no cases of endophthalmitis.

It is unlikely that a significant postoperative complication would be missed by examining a patient on the second day postoperatively rather than the first, and having a technician speak to the patient on day 1 adds a measure of safety, according to the study authors.

With surgeons often visiting multiple offices, having patients seen on the second day, rather than the first, could create a more flexible and convenient option for patients.

“The current standard for vitreoretinal surgery is a POD1 examination. Hopefully, series such as this one will gradually shift the standard of care in a more patient-friendly direction without compromising safety,” the authors wrote. – by Rebecca L. Forand

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients who undergo vitreoretinal surgery can be examined on the second postoperative day without negative effects in order to allow a more convenient patient care, according to a study.

A retrospective review of 134 patients who underwent vitreoretinal surgery found second day postoperative examinations to be just as effective as first day examinations in diagnosing postoperative complications.

Each patient received a phone call from a technician on the first day after surgery to assess pain and vision. In only one case did the patient’s report of severe pain necessitate a first day examination. The remaining patients were seen on postoperative day 2.

Mean preoperative IOP was 15 mm Hg (range, 5 mm Hg to 39 mm Hg), and mean postoperative day 2 IOP was 16 mm Hg (range, 4 mm Hg to 57 mm Hg). Pressure was normalized with medical treatment in the six patients whose postoperative day 2 IOP was greater than 30 mm Hg. There were no cases of endophthalmitis.

It is unlikely that a significant postoperative complication would be missed by examining a patient on the second day postoperatively rather than the first, and having a technician speak to the patient on day 1 adds a measure of safety, according to the study authors.

With surgeons often visiting multiple offices, having patients seen on the second day, rather than the first, could create a more flexible and convenient option for patients.

“The current standard for vitreoretinal surgery is a POD1 examination. Hopefully, series such as this one will gradually shift the standard of care in a more patient-friendly direction without compromising safety,” the authors wrote. – by Rebecca L. Forand

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.