Meeting News Coverage

RELATE study: Increased ranibizumab, laser yield minimal benefits

BOSTON — An increased dose of ranibizumab offered no added benefit in eyes with retinal vein occlusion, according to a study presented here.

Additionally, laser photocoagulation did not improve vision or reduce edema significantly more than ranibizumab, Peter A. Campochiaro, MD, said at Macula 2015.

“With regard to a higher dose of ranibizumab, there’s no benefit in patients with BRVO, but in patients with CRVO, there is greater reduction of edema but at least over the small snapshot of 6 months, this does not translate into improvement in visual acuity,” Campochiaro said.

Campochiaro reported results of the Ranibizumab Dose Comparison (0.5 mg and 2 mg) and the Role of Laser in the Management of Retinal Vein Occlusion (RELATE) study.

The study included 42 patients with branch retinal vein occlusion and 39 patients with central retinal vein occlusion randomized to receive 0.5 mg or 2 mg Lucentis (ranibizumab, Genentech) every 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was mean change from baseline best corrected visual acuity at 24 weeks.

At 24 weeks, patients were re-randomized to receive ranibizumab plus laser treatment or ranibizumab as needed. Endpoints were 48, 96 and 144 weeks. The primary outcome measures were mean change in BCVA, central subretinal thickness and number of ranibizumab treatments.

Results of the first phase of the study showed that among patients with BRVO, those who received 2 mg or 0.5 mg injections had similar visual outcomes.

Mean central subretinal thickness decreased significantly more in patients with CRVO who received 2 mg injections than in those who received 0.5 mg injections.

BRVO patients who received 2 mg or 0.5 mg injections had similar reductions in central subretinal thickness.

Results of the re-randomization arm of the study showed that, at 48 weeks, mean BCVA was similar in patients in the ranibizumab plus laser photocoagulation group and the ranibizumab as-needed group.

Central subretinal thickness increased but reverted to baseline in the ranibizumab plus laser group and ranibizumab group.

Laser treatment did not reduce the mean number of ranibizumab injections, Campochiaro said.

Disclosure: Campochiaro has financial relationships with Genentech and Regeneron.

BOSTON — An increased dose of ranibizumab offered no added benefit in eyes with retinal vein occlusion, according to a study presented here.

Additionally, laser photocoagulation did not improve vision or reduce edema significantly more than ranibizumab, Peter A. Campochiaro, MD, said at Macula 2015.

“With regard to a higher dose of ranibizumab, there’s no benefit in patients with BRVO, but in patients with CRVO, there is greater reduction of edema but at least over the small snapshot of 6 months, this does not translate into improvement in visual acuity,” Campochiaro said.

Campochiaro reported results of the Ranibizumab Dose Comparison (0.5 mg and 2 mg) and the Role of Laser in the Management of Retinal Vein Occlusion (RELATE) study.

The study included 42 patients with branch retinal vein occlusion and 39 patients with central retinal vein occlusion randomized to receive 0.5 mg or 2 mg Lucentis (ranibizumab, Genentech) every 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was mean change from baseline best corrected visual acuity at 24 weeks.

At 24 weeks, patients were re-randomized to receive ranibizumab plus laser treatment or ranibizumab as needed. Endpoints were 48, 96 and 144 weeks. The primary outcome measures were mean change in BCVA, central subretinal thickness and number of ranibizumab treatments.

Results of the first phase of the study showed that among patients with BRVO, those who received 2 mg or 0.5 mg injections had similar visual outcomes.

Mean central subretinal thickness decreased significantly more in patients with CRVO who received 2 mg injections than in those who received 0.5 mg injections.

BRVO patients who received 2 mg or 0.5 mg injections had similar reductions in central subretinal thickness.

Results of the re-randomization arm of the study showed that, at 48 weeks, mean BCVA was similar in patients in the ranibizumab plus laser photocoagulation group and the ranibizumab as-needed group.

Central subretinal thickness increased but reverted to baseline in the ranibizumab plus laser group and ranibizumab group.

Laser treatment did not reduce the mean number of ranibizumab injections, Campochiaro said.

Disclosure: Campochiaro has financial relationships with Genentech and Regeneron.

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