Meeting News

Targeted laser photocoagulation treats select cases of diabetic retinopathy

HONOLULU — Targeted retinal photocoagulation may be used to treat severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy as well as some cases of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, according to a poster presented here.

Pallavi Singh, MD, of Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, New Delhi, and colleagues undertook a nonrandomized, prospective, interventional study of 30 treatment-naive eyes with NPDR or PDR without high-risk characteristics (HRC) treated with targeted retinal photocoagulation over capillary nonperfusion areas.

Areas of treatment were identified with Optos ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography.

“We delineated the capillary nonperfusion areas and performed targeted laser in these particular areas to see the effect of what it would be like to do just a targeted laser and not a full scatter laser like what is done conventionally for these patients,” Singh told Healio.com/OSN.

In the treated patients, visual acuity statistically significantly improved at 6 weeks (P = .001) and was stable at 6 months (P = .003) compared with baseline. Contrast sensitivity increased after photocoagulation at 6 weeks (P = .001) and 6 months (P = .006) compared with baseline. Central macular thickness did not change.

“Especially for patients with NPDR or PDR without HRC, we can go ahead and do a targeted laser and not a full scatter laser, and we can avoid all the side effects that are usually seen with the scatter laser,” Singh said. by Patricia Nale, ELS

Reference:

Singh P, et al. Ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography guided targeted retinal photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting; April 28-May 3, 2018; Honolulu.

Disclosure: Singh reports no relevant financial disclosures.

HONOLULU — Targeted retinal photocoagulation may be used to treat severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy as well as some cases of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, according to a poster presented here.

Pallavi Singh, MD, of Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, New Delhi, and colleagues undertook a nonrandomized, prospective, interventional study of 30 treatment-naive eyes with NPDR or PDR without high-risk characteristics (HRC) treated with targeted retinal photocoagulation over capillary nonperfusion areas.

Areas of treatment were identified with Optos ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography.

“We delineated the capillary nonperfusion areas and performed targeted laser in these particular areas to see the effect of what it would be like to do just a targeted laser and not a full scatter laser like what is done conventionally for these patients,” Singh told Healio.com/OSN.

In the treated patients, visual acuity statistically significantly improved at 6 weeks (P = .001) and was stable at 6 months (P = .003) compared with baseline. Contrast sensitivity increased after photocoagulation at 6 weeks (P = .001) and 6 months (P = .006) compared with baseline. Central macular thickness did not change.

“Especially for patients with NPDR or PDR without HRC, we can go ahead and do a targeted laser and not a full scatter laser, and we can avoid all the side effects that are usually seen with the scatter laser,” Singh said. by Patricia Nale, ELS

Reference:

Singh P, et al. Ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography guided targeted retinal photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting; April 28-May 3, 2018; Honolulu.

Disclosure: Singh reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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