Orion system shows positive safety, efficacy profile in feasibility study

An early feasibility study showed the Orion visual cortical prosthesis system was generally safe, with all patients being able to see phosphenes and some being able to detect motion at 12 months after implant, Second Sight Medical Products announced in a press release.

The Orion is an implantable cortical stimulation device designed to provide artificial vision to individuals who are blind by converting images captured by a miniature video camera mounted on glasses into a series of small electrical pulses, transmitted wirelessly to an array of electrodes implanted on the surface of the brain’s visual cortex.

Two of the study’s principal investigators presented the 12-month data at the World Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery annual meeting.

Of six patients enrolled in the study, two experienced an adverse device event, with one experiencing a serious adverse event, the release said.

At 12 months, three out of four subjects could locate a high-contrast target significantly better with the device on than with it off (P < .05), and three out of four subjects could determine the direction of motion of that target better with the system on (P < .05), the release said.

“The first four subjects have now reached 12 months post-implant, and participants appear to be making steady improvements in their ability to perform everyday tasks and successfully meet the study’s functional vision endpoint goals,” Will McGuire, Second Sight president and CEO, said in the release.

An early feasibility study showed the Orion visual cortical prosthesis system was generally safe, with all patients being able to see phosphenes and some being able to detect motion at 12 months after implant, Second Sight Medical Products announced in a press release.

The Orion is an implantable cortical stimulation device designed to provide artificial vision to individuals who are blind by converting images captured by a miniature video camera mounted on glasses into a series of small electrical pulses, transmitted wirelessly to an array of electrodes implanted on the surface of the brain’s visual cortex.

Two of the study’s principal investigators presented the 12-month data at the World Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery annual meeting.

Of six patients enrolled in the study, two experienced an adverse device event, with one experiencing a serious adverse event, the release said.

At 12 months, three out of four subjects could locate a high-contrast target significantly better with the device on than with it off (P < .05), and three out of four subjects could determine the direction of motion of that target better with the system on (P < .05), the release said.

“The first four subjects have now reached 12 months post-implant, and participants appear to be making steady improvements in their ability to perform everyday tasks and successfully meet the study’s functional vision endpoint goals,” Will McGuire, Second Sight president and CEO, said in the release.