Meeting News Coverage

Anti-VEGFs control CNV, preserve VA in patients with choroidal osteoma

TORONTO — Intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab are useful in treating choroidal neovascularization associated with choroidal osteoma, according to a poster presented at the American Society of Retina Specialists meeting. Exudation was controlled and visual acuity was preserved.

The retrospective study included eight patients: seven who presented with blurred vision and one who presented with photopsia. Mean age was 36.5 years; seven of the patients were white women.

All patients underwent intravitreal injections of Avastin (bevacizumab, Genentech) or Lucentis (ranibizumab, Genentech).

Patients received a mean of 8.5 injections, and four patients underwent adjunctive photodynamic therapy (PDT).

Primary outcome measures were resolution of intraretinal, subretinal or subretinal pigment epithelial fluid identified on optical coherence tomography and change in Snellen visual acuity from baseline values.

Mean follow-up was 32.5 months.

Exudation was controlled successfully in seven patients, with patients gaining an average of one line of visual acuity.

Exudation recurred at least once in four patients a mean 11 months after the most recent injection. One patient who underwent adjunctive PDT experienced recurrence.

“Continued monitoring is essential. Recurrent leakage is common and may occur months after initial control,” M. Ali Khan and co-authors wrote.

PDT should be considered early for extrafoveal tumors. Anti-VEGF injection may be the only available treatment option for subfoveal tumors, they wrote.

Disclosure: Khan and colleagues report no relevant financial disclosures.

TORONTO — Intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab are useful in treating choroidal neovascularization associated with choroidal osteoma, according to a poster presented at the American Society of Retina Specialists meeting. Exudation was controlled and visual acuity was preserved.

The retrospective study included eight patients: seven who presented with blurred vision and one who presented with photopsia. Mean age was 36.5 years; seven of the patients were white women.

All patients underwent intravitreal injections of Avastin (bevacizumab, Genentech) or Lucentis (ranibizumab, Genentech).

Patients received a mean of 8.5 injections, and four patients underwent adjunctive photodynamic therapy (PDT).

Primary outcome measures were resolution of intraretinal, subretinal or subretinal pigment epithelial fluid identified on optical coherence tomography and change in Snellen visual acuity from baseline values.

Mean follow-up was 32.5 months.

Exudation was controlled successfully in seven patients, with patients gaining an average of one line of visual acuity.

Exudation recurred at least once in four patients a mean 11 months after the most recent injection. One patient who underwent adjunctive PDT experienced recurrence.

“Continued monitoring is essential. Recurrent leakage is common and may occur months after initial control,” M. Ali Khan and co-authors wrote.

PDT should be considered early for extrafoveal tumors. Anti-VEGF injection may be the only available treatment option for subfoveal tumors, they wrote.

Disclosure: Khan and colleagues report no relevant financial disclosures.

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