Cedars-Sinai receives $10.5 million to study RP stem cell treatment

Cedars-Sinai researchers have received a $10.5 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to launch a clinical trial evaluating stem cell technology for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa, according to a press release.

The trial includes injecting CNS10-NPC, a cortical progenitor cell product, into one eye of up to 16 patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Vision in both eyes of each patient will be compared and overall safety evaluated.

"We want to make sure the injections do not have unwanted side effects, such as surgical complications or an immune reaction," Clive Svendsen, PhD, the trial’s principal investigator, said.

Preclinical research of the treatment, which led to the FDA’s trial approval, was also funded by a CIRM grant.

"Throughout our years of painstaking research on retinitis pigmentosa, CIRM has been a steady partner and supporter of our work," Svendsen said. "This $10.5 million award will propel us into the next phase of our effort by allowing us to move forward with a clinical trial."

Cedars-Sinai researchers have received a $10.5 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to launch a clinical trial evaluating stem cell technology for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa, according to a press release.

The trial includes injecting CNS10-NPC, a cortical progenitor cell product, into one eye of up to 16 patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Vision in both eyes of each patient will be compared and overall safety evaluated.

"We want to make sure the injections do not have unwanted side effects, such as surgical complications or an immune reaction," Clive Svendsen, PhD, the trial’s principal investigator, said.

Preclinical research of the treatment, which led to the FDA’s trial approval, was also funded by a CIRM grant.

"Throughout our years of painstaking research on retinitis pigmentosa, CIRM has been a steady partner and supporter of our work," Svendsen said. "This $10.5 million award will propel us into the next phase of our effort by allowing us to move forward with a clinical trial."