Meeting News Coverage

Hands-free illumination system enables retinal detachment surgery without assistance

Jean-Antoine Pournaras, MD
Jean-Antoine Pournaras

PARIS — A noncontact illumination system used at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, provides good visualization while leaving one hand free and eliminating the need for an assistant during retinal surgery, according to a speaker here.

Illumination is provided by a slit lamp, which directs the light toward a 90 D lens, fixated with an angulated arm to the operating table and suspended over the patient's eye.

"This simple system provides panoramic viewing of the ocular fundus during the entire procedure, allowing the surgeon to operate on the retina and at the same time perform peripheral indentation in a completely self-sufficient manner. The hand that normally holds the endoilluminator remains free and can be used for surgical maneuvers," Jean-Antoine Pournaras, MD, said at the meeting of the French Society of Ophthalmology.

In a study of 61 pseudophakic patients undergoing retinal detachment surgery, external illumination was used in conjunction with 23-gauge vitrectomy. All procedures were successfully performed by the surgeon alone. Visualization was good at all stages and surgical time decreased.

  • Disclosure: Dr. Pournaras has no direct financial interest in the products discussed in this article, nor is he a paid consultant for any companies mentioned.
Jean-Antoine Pournaras, MD
Jean-Antoine Pournaras

PARIS — A noncontact illumination system used at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, provides good visualization while leaving one hand free and eliminating the need for an assistant during retinal surgery, according to a speaker here.

Illumination is provided by a slit lamp, which directs the light toward a 90 D lens, fixated with an angulated arm to the operating table and suspended over the patient's eye.

"This simple system provides panoramic viewing of the ocular fundus during the entire procedure, allowing the surgeon to operate on the retina and at the same time perform peripheral indentation in a completely self-sufficient manner. The hand that normally holds the endoilluminator remains free and can be used for surgical maneuvers," Jean-Antoine Pournaras, MD, said at the meeting of the French Society of Ophthalmology.

In a study of 61 pseudophakic patients undergoing retinal detachment surgery, external illumination was used in conjunction with 23-gauge vitrectomy. All procedures were successfully performed by the surgeon alone. Visualization was good at all stages and surgical time decreased.

  • Disclosure: Dr. Pournaras has no direct financial interest in the products discussed in this article, nor is he a paid consultant for any companies mentioned.