Meeting News

Autologous retinal transplants are ‘true transplants’ for macular holes

Tamer H. Mahmoud

NEW ORLEANS — Autologous retinal transplants for macular holes provide “true transplants” and are not just plugs, according to a speaker here.

“With the autologous retinal transplant at this stage, we didn’t have any major complications. I don’t think it’s just a plug for macular holes from what we’re seeing and from the morphology. It’s a true transplant, but even more. There are morphological and functional changes and no need for immunosuppression,” Tamer H. Mahmoud, MD, said at Retina Subspecialty Day preceding the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting.

Mahmoud said he performed his first autologous retinal transplant after he was unable to use an internal limiting membrane to close a macular hole and prevent a recurrent detachment. Instead, he used a piece of retina to close the hole and noticed the patient’s vision gradually improved, and as it improved the retina thickened with development of its outer layers.

Since the initial transplant, there have been more than 100 cases performed worldwide, 17 of which have been performed by Mahmoud.

“The key is to have a very high pressure of the silicone oil initially so it doesn’t move in place and then gradually getting that [perfluorocarbon] out away from the transplant. The integration of the flap takes between 1 week and 1 month,” he said. – by Robert Linnehan

Reference:

Mahmoud TH. Autologous retinal transplant for macular holes: Initial experience. Presented at AAO Subspecialty Days; Nov. 10-11, 2017; New Orleans.

 

Disclosure: Mahmoud reports he is a consultant for Alimera Sciences, DORC International/Dutch Ophthalmic USA and Spark Therapeutics; and receives grant support from Genentech.

Tamer H. Mahmoud

NEW ORLEANS — Autologous retinal transplants for macular holes provide “true transplants” and are not just plugs, according to a speaker here.

“With the autologous retinal transplant at this stage, we didn’t have any major complications. I don’t think it’s just a plug for macular holes from what we’re seeing and from the morphology. It’s a true transplant, but even more. There are morphological and functional changes and no need for immunosuppression,” Tamer H. Mahmoud, MD, said at Retina Subspecialty Day preceding the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting.

Mahmoud said he performed his first autologous retinal transplant after he was unable to use an internal limiting membrane to close a macular hole and prevent a recurrent detachment. Instead, he used a piece of retina to close the hole and noticed the patient’s vision gradually improved, and as it improved the retina thickened with development of its outer layers.

Since the initial transplant, there have been more than 100 cases performed worldwide, 17 of which have been performed by Mahmoud.

“The key is to have a very high pressure of the silicone oil initially so it doesn’t move in place and then gradually getting that [perfluorocarbon] out away from the transplant. The integration of the flap takes between 1 week and 1 month,” he said. – by Robert Linnehan

Reference:

Mahmoud TH. Autologous retinal transplant for macular holes: Initial experience. Presented at AAO Subspecialty Days; Nov. 10-11, 2017; New Orleans.

 

Disclosure: Mahmoud reports he is a consultant for Alimera Sciences, DORC International/Dutch Ophthalmic USA and Spark Therapeutics; and receives grant support from Genentech.

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