In the Journals

Repository corticotropin injection may reduce uveitis medication use

Patients with uveitis treated with repository corticotropin injection experienced a reduction in uveitis medication use and improvement in vision, according to a study.

The retrospective review of medical records included 91 patients with uveitis. Twenty-one patients had mild or no visual impairment, 48 had moderate visual impairment, and 21 had severe visual impairment; severity was not known in one patient. No patients were blind before repository corticotropin injection (RCI).

RCI dosing regimens and course of treatment were different for each patient. Patients had used a mean of 2.5 medications before the current injection regimen, and all patients had used at least one medication for uveitis before RCI therapy.

During RCI treatment, use of concomitant medications reduced to 52 patients, and after therapy, use was reduced to 20 patients. For those who remained on concomitant medications, the medication dosage was reduced.

Improvements in vision were reported in 86% of patients; 27% of patients experienced improvements in pain, and 26% experienced improvements in vitreous haze.

The researchers categorized 84% of patients as improved after treatment and 16% as the same. No patients in the cohort worsened.

Disclosures: Nelson reports she is an employee of Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with uveitis treated with repository corticotropin injection experienced a reduction in uveitis medication use and improvement in vision, according to a study.

The retrospective review of medical records included 91 patients with uveitis. Twenty-one patients had mild or no visual impairment, 48 had moderate visual impairment, and 21 had severe visual impairment; severity was not known in one patient. No patients were blind before repository corticotropin injection (RCI).

RCI dosing regimens and course of treatment were different for each patient. Patients had used a mean of 2.5 medications before the current injection regimen, and all patients had used at least one medication for uveitis before RCI therapy.

During RCI treatment, use of concomitant medications reduced to 52 patients, and after therapy, use was reduced to 20 patients. For those who remained on concomitant medications, the medication dosage was reduced.

Improvements in vision were reported in 86% of patients; 27% of patients experienced improvements in pain, and 26% experienced improvements in vitreous haze.

The researchers categorized 84% of patients as improved after treatment and 16% as the same. No patients in the cohort worsened.

Disclosures: Nelson reports she is an employee of Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.