Ophthalmic Surgery, Lasers and Imaging Retina

Imaging Case Report 

Distinctive Findings in a Patient With Axenfeld–Rieger Syndrome Using High-Resolution AS-OCT

Dandan Wang, MD; Mei Wang, MD, PhD; James W. Console, BS; Mingguang He, MD, PhD; Michael I. Seider, BGS; Shan C. Lin, MD

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Some distinct findings of a patient with Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome from the anterior chamber angle images by high-resolution anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) are described. The typical anterior segment anomalies of Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, including iris atrophy, posterior embryotoxon, peripheral bridging tissue bands, trabecular meshwork elongation, and high insertion of the iris root into the posterior trabecular meshwork, can be visualized clearly on AS-OCT images. Specifically, the high-resolution mode of the AS-OCT program had improved performance in outlining finer structures such as the distinctive endothelial membrane covering the iris in Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, which enabled better understanding of the pathophysiology in the patient. The high-resolution imaging and non-contact method of AS-OCT make it an effective and feasible option in the diagnosis and evaluation of Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2009;40:589-592.]

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Some distinct findings of a patient with Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome from the anterior chamber angle images by high-resolution anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) are described. The typical anterior segment anomalies of Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, including iris atrophy, posterior embryotoxon, peripheral bridging tissue bands, trabecular meshwork elongation, and high insertion of the iris root into the posterior trabecular meshwork, can be visualized clearly on AS-OCT images. Specifically, the high-resolution mode of the AS-OCT program had improved performance in outlining finer structures such as the distinctive endothelial membrane covering the iris in Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, which enabled better understanding of the pathophysiology in the patient. The high-resolution imaging and non-contact method of AS-OCT make it an effective and feasible option in the diagnosis and evaluation of Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2009;40:589-592.]

Authors

From the Department of Ophthalmology (DW, MIS, SCL), University of California, San Francisco, California; Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology (DW, MW, MH), State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; and the University of Kansas School of Engineering (JWC), Kansas City, Kansas.

Accepted for publication July 23, 2008.

The authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Address correspondence to Shan C. Lin, MD, Box 0730, 10 Koret Way, San Francisco, CA 94143-0730.

10.3928/15428877-20091030-10

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