Meeting News Coverage

Multifocal, accommodating IOLs yield high patient satisfaction

NEW ORLEANS — Patients who underwent cataract surgery with bilateral multifocal and bilateral accommodating IOLs reported high satisfaction, according to a study presented here.

“Patients in both groups were very satisfied with the vision they have. They have gotten used to it at 5 years and felt that this was a good fit for them,” John A. Hovanesian, MD, FACS, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting.

John A. Hovanesian

The study included 117 patients who were administered a questionnaire at least 2 years after uncomplicated cataract surgery with either a multifocal IOL or an accommodating IOL. Of these patients, 68 received an accommodating IOL and 49 received a multifocal IOL.

All patients had healthy eyes and no significant ocular morbidity.

The questionnaire was administered by MDbackline, a software application that administers routine follow-up questionnaires to patients by email or text message, Hovanesian said.

At 5.4 years, about 90% of patients said they were “somewhat satisfied” or “very satisfied” and 90% of patients said they were likely to refer friends and family.

“There was absolutely no meaningful difference between the two types of lenses,” Hovanesian said.

Glare and halos occurred more frequently in the multifocal IOL group than in the accommodating IOL group. Glare and halos were reported in 56% and 27%, respectively, in the multifocal IOL group compared with 31% and 8% in the accommodating IOL group.

Sixty-three percent of patients in the accommodating IOL group and 48% of patients in the multifocal IOL group said they needed reading glasses to read a newspaper.

“One of the takeaways for us is that the idea of neuroadaptation probably doesn’t really happen with multifocals. Patients may stop complaining because they stop complaining,” Hovanesian said. “Among both groups, even if they had glare and halos, patients would not have chosen a different lens.” – by Nhu Te

Reference:

Hovanesian J. Satisfaction and spectacle independence with accommodating IOLs versus multifocal IOLs 2 years after surgery. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting; May 6-10, 2016; New Orleans, Louisiana.

Disclosure: Hovanesian reports he has financial interests with Alcon, Abbott Medical Optics, Bausch + Lomb and MDbackline.

NEW ORLEANS — Patients who underwent cataract surgery with bilateral multifocal and bilateral accommodating IOLs reported high satisfaction, according to a study presented here.

“Patients in both groups were very satisfied with the vision they have. They have gotten used to it at 5 years and felt that this was a good fit for them,” John A. Hovanesian, MD, FACS, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting.

John A. Hovanesian

The study included 117 patients who were administered a questionnaire at least 2 years after uncomplicated cataract surgery with either a multifocal IOL or an accommodating IOL. Of these patients, 68 received an accommodating IOL and 49 received a multifocal IOL.

All patients had healthy eyes and no significant ocular morbidity.

The questionnaire was administered by MDbackline, a software application that administers routine follow-up questionnaires to patients by email or text message, Hovanesian said.

At 5.4 years, about 90% of patients said they were “somewhat satisfied” or “very satisfied” and 90% of patients said they were likely to refer friends and family.

“There was absolutely no meaningful difference between the two types of lenses,” Hovanesian said.

Glare and halos occurred more frequently in the multifocal IOL group than in the accommodating IOL group. Glare and halos were reported in 56% and 27%, respectively, in the multifocal IOL group compared with 31% and 8% in the accommodating IOL group.

Sixty-three percent of patients in the accommodating IOL group and 48% of patients in the multifocal IOL group said they needed reading glasses to read a newspaper.

“One of the takeaways for us is that the idea of neuroadaptation probably doesn’t really happen with multifocals. Patients may stop complaining because they stop complaining,” Hovanesian said. “Among both groups, even if they had glare and halos, patients would not have chosen a different lens.” – by Nhu Te

Reference:

Hovanesian J. Satisfaction and spectacle independence with accommodating IOLs versus multifocal IOLs 2 years after surgery. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting; May 6-10, 2016; New Orleans, Louisiana.

Disclosure: Hovanesian reports he has financial interests with Alcon, Abbott Medical Optics, Bausch + Lomb and MDbackline.

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