Meeting News

Data monitoring key to tracking, improving toric IOL outcomes

NEW YORK — Keeping extensive records of accuracy, tracking outcomes and measuring accurately are key to improving surgical outcomes after toric IOL implantation and reducing the need for enhancement following the procedure, according to a speaker here.

“You want to automate as much as possible,” Denise M. Visco, MD, said at the OSN New York meeting. “It’s critical that if you put a lot of effort into measuring, you need to put a lot of effort into marking. You want to track your results and go in the direction of constantly improving, because you want to reduce the number of patients you need to fix. But, it all starts with measuring accurately.”

Denise M. Visco

Denise M. Visco

Visco said that her approach to successful toric IOL outcomes starts with accurate topography and that her data records help her choose the most useful tool.

“Accurate topography is very important for me. I like to measure posterior corneal astigmatism with my Cassini (topographer, i-Optics) and roll with that, but if I can’t get a good measurement with my posterior corneal topographer, what do I use next? My data told me that my IOL Master (Carl Zeiss Meditec) was my next best bet, then my Pentacam (Oculus) and my OPD (Nidek). I know what order to roll with if I’m not getting a result with my best device,” she said.

Measuring accurately, treating a patient with the correct IOL, tracking patient outcomes and making necessary corrections, such as repositioning an IOL or offering LASIK, can improve future toric IOL procedures, Visco said. – by Robert Linnehan

Reference:

Visco DM. My approach to successful toric IOL outcomes. Presented at: OSN New York annual meeting; Nov. 4-6, 2016; New York.

Disclosure: Visco reports she receives consulting fees from, is on the speakers bureau for and has completed contracted research for Lensar and Omeros.

NEW YORK — Keeping extensive records of accuracy, tracking outcomes and measuring accurately are key to improving surgical outcomes after toric IOL implantation and reducing the need for enhancement following the procedure, according to a speaker here.

“You want to automate as much as possible,” Denise M. Visco, MD, said at the OSN New York meeting. “It’s critical that if you put a lot of effort into measuring, you need to put a lot of effort into marking. You want to track your results and go in the direction of constantly improving, because you want to reduce the number of patients you need to fix. But, it all starts with measuring accurately.”

Denise M. Visco

Denise M. Visco

Visco said that her approach to successful toric IOL outcomes starts with accurate topography and that her data records help her choose the most useful tool.

“Accurate topography is very important for me. I like to measure posterior corneal astigmatism with my Cassini (topographer, i-Optics) and roll with that, but if I can’t get a good measurement with my posterior corneal topographer, what do I use next? My data told me that my IOL Master (Carl Zeiss Meditec) was my next best bet, then my Pentacam (Oculus) and my OPD (Nidek). I know what order to roll with if I’m not getting a result with my best device,” she said.

Measuring accurately, treating a patient with the correct IOL, tracking patient outcomes and making necessary corrections, such as repositioning an IOL or offering LASIK, can improve future toric IOL procedures, Visco said. – by Robert Linnehan

Reference:

Visco DM. My approach to successful toric IOL outcomes. Presented at: OSN New York annual meeting; Nov. 4-6, 2016; New York.

Disclosure: Visco reports she receives consulting fees from, is on the speakers bureau for and has completed contracted research for Lensar and Omeros.

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