Journal of Refractive Surgery

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Original Article 

Cyclosporine 0.05% Ophthalmic Preparation to Aid Recovery From Loss of Corneal Sensitivity After LASIK

Gholam A. Peyman, MD; Donald R. Sanders, MD, PhD; Juan F. Batlle, MD; Rafael Féliz, MD; Ginny Cabrera, MD

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine whether cyclosporine (0.05%) can safely and effectively accelerate corneal nerve regeneration after LASIK, thereby facilitating faster recovery of corneal sensitivity.

METHODS

This prospective, randomized, single-center clinical study comprised 44 eyes of 22 patients scheduled to undergo bilateral LASIK. One eye was randomly assigned to receive cyclosporine drops twice daily for 3 months in addition to standard postoperative LASIK medication. Corneal sensitivity was measured using the Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer in four areas outside and five areas inside the LASIK flap preoperatively and at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Safety parameters of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity and the incidence of adverse events were also collected.

RESULTS

For all four points outside the LASIK flap, normal corneal sensitivity was maintained throughout the study. In addition, no significant difference was found between the cyclosporine-treated eyes and the control eyes at these points. All points within the LASIK flap except the point closest to the hinge demonstrated profound corneal hypoesthesia at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month postoperatively with no differences noted between the control and cyclosporine-treated eyes. These same points had statistically significantly greater corneal sensitivity in the cyclosporine group relative to the control group (P<.011) at 3 months postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS

Cyclosporine was shown to significantly improve corneal sensitivity at 3 months after LASIK, which suggests that topical cyclosporine promotes enhanced corneal nerve regeneration. [J Refract Surg. 2008;24:337-343.]

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Arizona, and Arizona State University, Manicopa Hospital and Associated Retinal Consultants, Phoenix, Ariz (Peyman); University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, Chicago, Ill (Sanders); and Centro Láser, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (Batlle, Féliz, Cabrera).

Dr Peyman has a patent pending neuronal regeneration. The remaining authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Donald R. Sanders, MD, PhD, Center for Clinical Research, 242 N York Rd/Ste 102, Elmhurst, IL 60126. Tel: 630.530.9700 ext 12; Fax: 630.530.1636; E-mail: drsmd@drsmd.com

Received: July 5, 2007

Accepted: January 18, 2008

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine whether cyclosporine (0.05%) can safely and effectively accelerate corneal nerve regeneration after LASIK, thereby facilitating faster recovery of corneal sensitivity.

METHODS

This prospective, randomized, single-center clinical study comprised 44 eyes of 22 patients scheduled to undergo bilateral LASIK. One eye was randomly assigned to receive cyclosporine drops twice daily for 3 months in addition to standard postoperative LASIK medication. Corneal sensitivity was measured using the Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer in four areas outside and five areas inside the LASIK flap preoperatively and at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Safety parameters of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity and the incidence of adverse events were also collected.

RESULTS

For all four points outside the LASIK flap, normal corneal sensitivity was maintained throughout the study. In addition, no significant difference was found between the cyclosporine-treated eyes and the control eyes at these points. All points within the LASIK flap except the point closest to the hinge demonstrated profound corneal hypoesthesia at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month postoperatively with no differences noted between the control and cyclosporine-treated eyes. These same points had statistically significantly greater corneal sensitivity in the cyclosporine group relative to the control group (P<.011) at 3 months postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS

Cyclosporine was shown to significantly improve corneal sensitivity at 3 months after LASIK, which suggests that topical cyclosporine promotes enhanced corneal nerve regeneration. [J Refract Surg. 2008;24:337-343.]

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Arizona, and Arizona State University, Manicopa Hospital and Associated Retinal Consultants, Phoenix, Ariz (Peyman); University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, Chicago, Ill (Sanders); and Centro Láser, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (Batlle, Féliz, Cabrera).

Dr Peyman has a patent pending neuronal regeneration. The remaining authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Donald R. Sanders, MD, PhD, Center for Clinical Research, 242 N York Rd/Ste 102, Elmhurst, IL 60126. Tel: 630.530.9700 ext 12; Fax: 630.530.1636; E-mail: drsmd@drsmd.com

Received: July 5, 2007

Accepted: January 18, 2008

10.3928/1081597X-20080401-04

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