Journal of Refractive Surgery

Original Articles 

Accuracy and Precision of LASIK Flap Thickness Using the IntraLase Femtosecond Laser in 1000 Consecutive Cases

Gerard Sutton, FRANZCO, FRACS, MBBS; Chris Hodge, BAppSc(Orth)

Abstract

PURPOSE

To report the safety and flap thickness predictability of LASIK using the IntraLase femtosecond laser.

METHOD

A retrospective analysis of 1000 consecutive LASIK cases was performed to assess the rate of intra- and postoperative complications and loss of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA). A subset of 260 eyes was prospectively analyzed to assess flap thickness predictability using subtraction ultrasound on the day of surgery.

RESULTS

No serious intra- or postoperative complications were noted. Three (0.3%) patients had epithelial defects that required a bandage contact lens. Four (0.4%) patients had slipped caps on day 1 that required repositioning. Two (0.2%) patients developed grade I diffuse lamellar keratitis. No patient developed epithelial ingrowth >1 mm from the flap edge, transient light sensitivity, or infection. No patient lost >2 lines of BSCVA at 6 months postoperatively. With an attempted flap thickness of 105 µm with the 15-KHz laser, the mean flap thickness was 116.79±10.75 µm (range: 95 to 148 µm) (n=119). In the 30-KHz group (n=141), the target corneal flap thickness was 115 µm, with a mean flap thickness of 114.02±9.82 µm (range: 93 to 163 µm). Overall 87.3% of eyes were within ±20 µm of the intended result. Ninety-eight percent of caps created with the 30-KHz laser were within ±20 µm compared to 74.8% in the 15-KHz group.

CONCLUSIONS

LASIK surgery with the IntraLase femtosecond laser is safe and flap thickness is predictable. [J Refract Surg. 2008;24:802-806.]

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

From Auckland University, Save Sight and Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney (Sutton); and The Eye Institute, Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia (Sutton, Hodge).

The authors have no proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Gerard Sutton, FRANZCO, FRACS, MBBS, The Eye Institute, Level 3/270 Victoria Ave, Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia 2067. Tel: 61 2 9424 9999; Fax: 61 2 9410 3000; E-mail: gsutton@theeyeinstitute.com.au

Received: September 26, 2006

Accepted: September 12, 2007

Posted online: March 15, 2008

Abstract

PURPOSE

To report the safety and flap thickness predictability of LASIK using the IntraLase femtosecond laser.

METHOD

A retrospective analysis of 1000 consecutive LASIK cases was performed to assess the rate of intra- and postoperative complications and loss of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA). A subset of 260 eyes was prospectively analyzed to assess flap thickness predictability using subtraction ultrasound on the day of surgery.

RESULTS

No serious intra- or postoperative complications were noted. Three (0.3%) patients had epithelial defects that required a bandage contact lens. Four (0.4%) patients had slipped caps on day 1 that required repositioning. Two (0.2%) patients developed grade I diffuse lamellar keratitis. No patient developed epithelial ingrowth >1 mm from the flap edge, transient light sensitivity, or infection. No patient lost >2 lines of BSCVA at 6 months postoperatively. With an attempted flap thickness of 105 µm with the 15-KHz laser, the mean flap thickness was 116.79±10.75 µm (range: 95 to 148 µm) (n=119). In the 30-KHz group (n=141), the target corneal flap thickness was 115 µm, with a mean flap thickness of 114.02±9.82 µm (range: 93 to 163 µm). Overall 87.3% of eyes were within ±20 µm of the intended result. Ninety-eight percent of caps created with the 30-KHz laser were within ±20 µm compared to 74.8% in the 15-KHz group.

CONCLUSIONS

LASIK surgery with the IntraLase femtosecond laser is safe and flap thickness is predictable. [J Refract Surg. 2008;24:802-806.]

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

From Auckland University, Save Sight and Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney (Sutton); and The Eye Institute, Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia (Sutton, Hodge).

The authors have no proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Gerard Sutton, FRANZCO, FRACS, MBBS, The Eye Institute, Level 3/270 Victoria Ave, Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia 2067. Tel: 61 2 9424 9999; Fax: 61 2 9410 3000; E-mail: gsutton@theeyeinstitute.com.au

Received: September 26, 2006

Accepted: September 12, 2007

Posted online: March 15, 2008

10.3928/1081597X-20081001-06

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