OSN’s Publication Exclusives focus on preparing for future of ophthalmology

The April 25 issue of Ocular Surgery News focuses on practice management and prepping for how ophthalmic care will work in the future.

Read some of the issue online here:

 

Cover Story

Change is inevitable: Prepare for a challenging future in ophthalmology

The future of ophthalmic care will be different from the current landscape, and those who cannot adapt to the medical and economic changes may have difficulty practicing in this new age. Ophthalmologists will face significant challenges in the way they practice, the way they do business, and the way they treat patients. Certain megatrends are shaping the future of ophthalmology, and those who cannot position themselves well may find themselves struggling to keep up. Read more.

 

Lindstroms Perspective

Ophthalmology may be well-positioned to weather next economic downturn

I believe ophthalmology will do just fine, thank you, and that compared with many of our colleagues in other medical specialties, we are well-positioned to prosper in the decades ahead. Still, there is no shortage of challenges facing us in the short term. Read more.

 

CEDARS/ASPENS Debates

Prophylactic mitomycin with laser treatment may prevent haze but also may delay healing

Application of MMC in conjunction with PRK can be used in every case, but should it be? Read more.

 

The Dry Eye

Pharma reps: aggravation or asset?

What is up with all the chest-thumping bravado about refusing to spend any time with sales reps? Social media resounds with all manner of derring-do as doctors try to protect their “perfect record” of avoiding contact with the men and women who make their living talking to doctors. You know, stuff like: “I am proud to say that I have yet to give 1 MINUTE of face time to a rep in my entire career.” Next thing you know, we will be seeing those “No industrial accident signs” in doctors’ lounges. “XYZ Eye has now gone 3,054 doctor-days without seeing a pharma rep.” If you ask me, the whole notion is just silly. Read more.

 

Back to B asics

Twist technique to explant an IOL

For more than 99% of patients, the IOL that is implanted at the time of cataract surgery will be in place forever. However, there are rare occasions when we need to explant or exchange an IOL, and ideally, we want to be able to do this via the same small incision that was used for the original procedure. Read more.

The April 25 issue of Ocular Surgery News focuses on practice management and prepping for how ophthalmic care will work in the future.

Read some of the issue online here:

 

Cover Story

Change is inevitable: Prepare for a challenging future in ophthalmology

The future of ophthalmic care will be different from the current landscape, and those who cannot adapt to the medical and economic changes may have difficulty practicing in this new age. Ophthalmologists will face significant challenges in the way they practice, the way they do business, and the way they treat patients. Certain megatrends are shaping the future of ophthalmology, and those who cannot position themselves well may find themselves struggling to keep up. Read more.

 

Lindstroms Perspective

Ophthalmology may be well-positioned to weather next economic downturn

I believe ophthalmology will do just fine, thank you, and that compared with many of our colleagues in other medical specialties, we are well-positioned to prosper in the decades ahead. Still, there is no shortage of challenges facing us in the short term. Read more.

 

CEDARS/ASPENS Debates

Prophylactic mitomycin with laser treatment may prevent haze but also may delay healing

Application of MMC in conjunction with PRK can be used in every case, but should it be? Read more.

 

The Dry Eye

Pharma reps: aggravation or asset?

What is up with all the chest-thumping bravado about refusing to spend any time with sales reps? Social media resounds with all manner of derring-do as doctors try to protect their “perfect record” of avoiding contact with the men and women who make their living talking to doctors. You know, stuff like: “I am proud to say that I have yet to give 1 MINUTE of face time to a rep in my entire career.” Next thing you know, we will be seeing those “No industrial accident signs” in doctors’ lounges. “XYZ Eye has now gone 3,054 doctor-days without seeing a pharma rep.” If you ask me, the whole notion is just silly. Read more.

 

Back to B asics

Twist technique to explant an IOL

For more than 99% of patients, the IOL that is implanted at the time of cataract surgery will be in place forever. However, there are rare occasions when we need to explant or exchange an IOL, and ideally, we want to be able to do this via the same small incision that was used for the original procedure. Read more.