Wills Eye opens new training lab, named best training hospital

Wills Eye Hospital has expanded one of its training laboratories, allowing residents, fellows, faculty and others to practice basic and advanced surgical techniques.

The William Maul Measey Ophthalmic Surgical Training (MOST) laboratory, on the hospital’s eighth floor medical education center, includes nine workstations, each with operating microscopes integrated into high-definition smart screens, as well as two surgical simulators and four phacoemulsification units.

“It really recreates the operating room experience,” Julia A. Haller, MD, ophthalmologist-in-chief and William Tasman, MD, Endowed Chair at Wills Eye, and professor and chair of ophthalmology at Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, told Healio.com/OSN. “We are leveraging this technology to lift the game for all of our educational spaces on the eighth floor. We’re envisioning it as a huge upgrade on our existing wet lab, but one that can be parlayed into teaching people at all levels of ophthalmic surgical training and be used to develop new instrumentation and new technologies.”

Each workstation in the lab is ergonomically designed with adjustable chairs, tables and microscopes to ensure the health and well-being of those in training.

“Keeping people in good shape so that they can have long and productive careers is very important,” Haller said. “We need to have good practices instilled at a very early part in training.”

The opening of the MOST laboratory coincides with Wills Eye being named as the nation’s best residency training program for the second year in a row by Doximity, the largest online physician network.

“It’s gratifying to be recognized by your peers, and it’s nice to take top honors in a poll that has this type of credibility,” Haller said. “I think it accurately reflects and rewards the intentional hard work and thoughtfulness that goes into every single step of planning the Wills residency.” – by Rebecca L. Forand

Disclosure: No products or companies that would require financial disclosure are mentioned in this article.

Wills Eye Hospital has expanded one of its training laboratories, allowing residents, fellows, faculty and others to practice basic and advanced surgical techniques.

The William Maul Measey Ophthalmic Surgical Training (MOST) laboratory, on the hospital’s eighth floor medical education center, includes nine workstations, each with operating microscopes integrated into high-definition smart screens, as well as two surgical simulators and four phacoemulsification units.

“It really recreates the operating room experience,” Julia A. Haller, MD, ophthalmologist-in-chief and William Tasman, MD, Endowed Chair at Wills Eye, and professor and chair of ophthalmology at Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, told Healio.com/OSN. “We are leveraging this technology to lift the game for all of our educational spaces on the eighth floor. We’re envisioning it as a huge upgrade on our existing wet lab, but one that can be parlayed into teaching people at all levels of ophthalmic surgical training and be used to develop new instrumentation and new technologies.”

Each workstation in the lab is ergonomically designed with adjustable chairs, tables and microscopes to ensure the health and well-being of those in training.

“Keeping people in good shape so that they can have long and productive careers is very important,” Haller said. “We need to have good practices instilled at a very early part in training.”

The opening of the MOST laboratory coincides with Wills Eye being named as the nation’s best residency training program for the second year in a row by Doximity, the largest online physician network.

“It’s gratifying to be recognized by your peers, and it’s nice to take top honors in a poll that has this type of credibility,” Haller said. “I think it accurately reflects and rewards the intentional hard work and thoughtfulness that goes into every single step of planning the Wills residency.” – by Rebecca L. Forand

Disclosure: No products or companies that would require financial disclosure are mentioned in this article.