Meeting News Coverage

Caffeine improves saccade velocity after exercise fatigue

SEATTLE — Fatigue-induced impairments in saccade velocity after prolonged strenuous exercise can be reversed by caffeine, according to a poster presented here.

“It has been proven in primates that fatigue affects saccadic eye movement,” poster presenter Charlotte J. Connell told Ocular Surgery News at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting. With that premise, the researchers randomized 10 cyclists to receive either placebo or caffeine during a 180-minute cycling protocol. Saccadic eye movements and global motion perception were assessed before and after the protocol.

Whereas saccade velocity decreased by 5% with exercise fatigue, saccade velocity increased by 10% after the caffeine protocol.

 “Neither fatigue nor caffeine influenced saccade accuracy, global motion perception or the effects of social attention on the latency of eye movements,” the authors said.

Connell said that the applications for sports performance have yet to be explored and more study is needed.

Disclosure: Connell has no relevant financial disclosures.

SEATTLE — Fatigue-induced impairments in saccade velocity after prolonged strenuous exercise can be reversed by caffeine, according to a poster presented here.

“It has been proven in primates that fatigue affects saccadic eye movement,” poster presenter Charlotte J. Connell told Ocular Surgery News at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting. With that premise, the researchers randomized 10 cyclists to receive either placebo or caffeine during a 180-minute cycling protocol. Saccadic eye movements and global motion perception were assessed before and after the protocol.

Whereas saccade velocity decreased by 5% with exercise fatigue, saccade velocity increased by 10% after the caffeine protocol.

 “Neither fatigue nor caffeine influenced saccade accuracy, global motion perception or the effects of social attention on the latency of eye movements,” the authors said.

Connell said that the applications for sports performance have yet to be explored and more study is needed.

Disclosure: Connell has no relevant financial disclosures.

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