In the Journals

First year LAMP results: 0.05% atropine reduces myopic progression

In the first phase of the ongoing four-phase LAMP study, researchers report 0.05% atropine was most effective among three concentrations and placebo in controlling spherical equivalent and axial length in children with myopia.

The treatment phase of the Low-concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) double-masked study randomized 438 children aged 4 to 12 years to receive 1:1:1:1 either low dose atropine eye drops at concentrations of 0.05%, 0.025% or 0.01% or placebo eye drops in both eyes daily for 12 months.

A total of 383 participants were evaluated at the 1-year mark. Mean change in spherical equivalent was –0.27 D in the 0.05% atropine group, –0.46 D in the 0.025% group, –0.59 D in the 0.01% group and –0.81 D in the placebo group.

Axial elongation increased most in the placebo group, with 37.1% of eyes progressing 1 D or more compared with 15.2%, 12.6% and 27.8% of eyes in the 0.05%, 0.025% and 0.01% atropine groups, respectively. Furthermore, only 24.2% of eyes in the placebo group progressed less than 0.5 D, compared with 69.6%, 51.6% and 43.8% in the three atropine groups, respectively.

“Our results altogether have provided new evidence for low-concentration atropine as an effective and safe intervention against myopia progression,” the researchers said.

The second phase of the study will involve a cross-over of patients in the placebo group into the optimal treatment group, then continuation of atropine treatment to evaluate efficacy and side effects at 2 years. – by Patricia Nale, ELS

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

 

In the first phase of the ongoing four-phase LAMP study, researchers report 0.05% atropine was most effective among three concentrations and placebo in controlling spherical equivalent and axial length in children with myopia.

The treatment phase of the Low-concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) double-masked study randomized 438 children aged 4 to 12 years to receive 1:1:1:1 either low dose atropine eye drops at concentrations of 0.05%, 0.025% or 0.01% or placebo eye drops in both eyes daily for 12 months.

A total of 383 participants were evaluated at the 1-year mark. Mean change in spherical equivalent was –0.27 D in the 0.05% atropine group, –0.46 D in the 0.025% group, –0.59 D in the 0.01% group and –0.81 D in the placebo group.

Axial elongation increased most in the placebo group, with 37.1% of eyes progressing 1 D or more compared with 15.2%, 12.6% and 27.8% of eyes in the 0.05%, 0.025% and 0.01% atropine groups, respectively. Furthermore, only 24.2% of eyes in the placebo group progressed less than 0.5 D, compared with 69.6%, 51.6% and 43.8% in the three atropine groups, respectively.

“Our results altogether have provided new evidence for low-concentration atropine as an effective and safe intervention against myopia progression,” the researchers said.

The second phase of the study will involve a cross-over of patients in the placebo group into the optimal treatment group, then continuation of atropine treatment to evaluate efficacy and side effects at 2 years. – by Patricia Nale, ELS

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.