In the Journals

Orthokeratology slows myopia progression over long term

Overnight orthokeratology correction slowed myopia progression in a cohort of patients compared with a control group over a follow-up period of up to 12 years.

The retrospective study included data for 203 eyes from 66 orthokeratology school-age patients and 36 control matched subjects. Myopia ranged from –0.5 D to –8 D, and astigmatism ranged from 0 D to –3 D in the study cohort. About 70.2% of orthokeratology patients began correction at 10 years of age or older.

The orthokeratology group experienced a significantly lower refractive error change (P < .001) during the follow-up period compared with the control group. The orthokeratology patients experienced a gradual decrease of corneal curvature per 2-year period in the follow-up years.

“Our results showed better myopia control by orthokeratology in the first 8 years of the study period, with the differences between the two groups narrowing gradually. The reduced myopic control effect may [be] due to decreasing progression as age increased,” the researchers wrote, adding that the finding had been reported in prior studies.

The researchers noted that greater astigmatism power resulted in an increased change of refractive error during the follow-up period. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Overnight orthokeratology correction slowed myopia progression in a cohort of patients compared with a control group over a follow-up period of up to 12 years.

The retrospective study included data for 203 eyes from 66 orthokeratology school-age patients and 36 control matched subjects. Myopia ranged from –0.5 D to –8 D, and astigmatism ranged from 0 D to –3 D in the study cohort. About 70.2% of orthokeratology patients began correction at 10 years of age or older.

The orthokeratology group experienced a significantly lower refractive error change (P < .001) during the follow-up period compared with the control group. The orthokeratology patients experienced a gradual decrease of corneal curvature per 2-year period in the follow-up years.

“Our results showed better myopia control by orthokeratology in the first 8 years of the study period, with the differences between the two groups narrowing gradually. The reduced myopic control effect may [be] due to decreasing progression as age increased,” the researchers wrote, adding that the finding had been reported in prior studies.

The researchers noted that greater astigmatism power resulted in an increased change of refractive error during the follow-up period. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.