In the Journals

Prismatic correction can result in positive motor outcomes in esotropic children

Prismatic correction led to successful motor outcomes while maintaining or improving stereo acuity in children with consecutive esotropia and prior unilateral recession and resection surgery, according to a study.

The retrospective cohort study analyzed 105 patients with esodeviation of 5 ∆D or greater at 4 weeks after undergoing unilateral recession and resection surgery by the same surgeon. All patients were fitted with prism glasses with a minimum postoperative follow-up of 2 years. Average patient age was 4.7 years.

Patients were then categorized into two groups. The prism-weaned group comprised 34 patients who were weaned from prismatic correction within 1 year. The prism-wearing group comprised 71 patients who continued prismatic correction beyond 1 year.

Average duration of prism wearing was 20.9 months, and average rate of deviation decline was 2.9 ∆D every 6 months.

There was a significantly higher recurrence rate in the prism-weaned group, whereas the prism-wearing group had a significantly higher rate of overcorrection (P = .003).

The researchers said 71% of patients attained successful motor outcomes and 92% of patients maintained or improved stereo acuity at the final visit.

Prismatic correction led to successful motor outcomes while maintaining or improving stereo acuity in children with consecutive esotropia and prior unilateral recession and resection surgery, according to a study.

The retrospective cohort study analyzed 105 patients with esodeviation of 5 ∆D or greater at 4 weeks after undergoing unilateral recession and resection surgery by the same surgeon. All patients were fitted with prism glasses with a minimum postoperative follow-up of 2 years. Average patient age was 4.7 years.

Patients were then categorized into two groups. The prism-weaned group comprised 34 patients who were weaned from prismatic correction within 1 year. The prism-wearing group comprised 71 patients who continued prismatic correction beyond 1 year.

Average duration of prism wearing was 20.9 months, and average rate of deviation decline was 2.9 ∆D every 6 months.

There was a significantly higher recurrence rate in the prism-weaned group, whereas the prism-wearing group had a significantly higher rate of overcorrection (P = .003).

The researchers said 71% of patients attained successful motor outcomes and 92% of patients maintained or improved stereo acuity at the final visit.