Add-on code allows billing for Zepto-guided visual axis centration

A new Category III CPT add-on code, +0514T, went into effect Jan. 1 and will allow surgeons to bill for Zepto-guided visual axis centration in conjunction with cataract surgery.

The code is for a procedure from Mynosys and allows surgeons to bill for intraoperative visual axis identification using patient fixation. It is an add-on code used in conjunction with a primary cataract procedure and can only be used with codes 66982 and 66984, according to Todd Pinkney, vice president of U.S. sales and marketing for Mynosys.

“In terms of how it gets used, surgeons can bill for their professional services through the [Advance Beneficiary Notice] process. The facility cannot charge for the handpiece or the console. The patient is responsible for those additional services,” he told Ocular Surgery News.

The language of the add-on code was drafted by the American Medical Association working with the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The add-on code is available until Jan. 1, 2024.

When payers do not cover the procedure and the patient agrees to the procedure, an individual surgeon can bill for these additional or premium services through the ABN process, acknowledging that it is not covered by the patient’s insurance, Pinkney said. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosure: Pinkney reports he is the vice president of U.S. sales and marketing for Mynosys.

A new Category III CPT add-on code, +0514T, went into effect Jan. 1 and will allow surgeons to bill for Zepto-guided visual axis centration in conjunction with cataract surgery.

The code is for a procedure from Mynosys and allows surgeons to bill for intraoperative visual axis identification using patient fixation. It is an add-on code used in conjunction with a primary cataract procedure and can only be used with codes 66982 and 66984, according to Todd Pinkney, vice president of U.S. sales and marketing for Mynosys.

“In terms of how it gets used, surgeons can bill for their professional services through the [Advance Beneficiary Notice] process. The facility cannot charge for the handpiece or the console. The patient is responsible for those additional services,” he told Ocular Surgery News.

The language of the add-on code was drafted by the American Medical Association working with the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The add-on code is available until Jan. 1, 2024.

When payers do not cover the procedure and the patient agrees to the procedure, an individual surgeon can bill for these additional or premium services through the ABN process, acknowledging that it is not covered by the patient’s insurance, Pinkney said. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosure: Pinkney reports he is the vice president of U.S. sales and marketing for Mynosys.