David Apple Laboratory launched at University of Heidelberg

The University of Heidelberg has completed the initial phase of establishing an international laboratory for research on intraocular devices that extends the work of the late David J. Apple, MD, according to a news release.

Apple’s lab in Charleston, S.C., will remain open for the receipt of device samples from U.S. surgeons, Gerd U. Auffarth, MD, chairman of the Heidelberg Eye Department, said in the release, while the university will house all of Apple’s archives, historical laboratory samples and correspondence and serve as the international side of the lab.

“This is a wonderful way to remember David and see his work continue,” Apple’s widow, Ann, said in the release. “Heidelberg was a favorite city of David’s, and it is so appropriate that the laboratory is now under the care of Gerd, his former student and research fellow.”

Auffarth acknowledged the aid of the medical device industry in helping to ship large crates of material from South Carolina to Germany.

“For us it is a great honor to carry on David’s work,” Auffarth said in the release. “With this lab we want to keep his name and his spirit alive.”

The University of Heidelberg has completed the initial phase of establishing an international laboratory for research on intraocular devices that extends the work of the late David J. Apple, MD, according to a news release.

Apple’s lab in Charleston, S.C., will remain open for the receipt of device samples from U.S. surgeons, Gerd U. Auffarth, MD, chairman of the Heidelberg Eye Department, said in the release, while the university will house all of Apple’s archives, historical laboratory samples and correspondence and serve as the international side of the lab.

“This is a wonderful way to remember David and see his work continue,” Apple’s widow, Ann, said in the release. “Heidelberg was a favorite city of David’s, and it is so appropriate that the laboratory is now under the care of Gerd, his former student and research fellow.”

Auffarth acknowledged the aid of the medical device industry in helping to ship large crates of material from South Carolina to Germany.

“For us it is a great honor to carry on David’s work,” Auffarth said in the release. “With this lab we want to keep his name and his spirit alive.”