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Multimodal imaging can detect 'ghost' tumors

PHILADELPHIA — Multimodal imaging can assist in detecting intraocular tumors that cannot be seen with ophthalmoscopy, according to a speaker at the Wills Eye Conference.

“We call these invisible intraocular tumors ‘ghost’ tumors because they are impossible to see with ophthalmoscopy but visible with multimodal imaging,” Jerry A. Shields, MD, said.

Between 1% and 2% of eyes with retinoblastoma, retinal hemangioblastoma and retinal astrocytic hamartoma have subclinical ghost tumors. Shields discussed seven examples in which the fundus appeared normal, but multimodal imaging detected retinal hemangioblastoma, retinal astrocytic hamartoma, choroidal metastasis, iris microhemangiomatosis or choroidal melanoma.

OCT, fluorescein angiography and autofluorescence were the imaging methods most likely to detect an invisible tumor.

“Multimodal imaging can help detect these invisible tumors, and this might allow for earlier diagnosis and prompt treatment for selected subclinical tumors in the future,” Shields said. – by Rebecca L. Forand

 

Reference:

Shields JA. Invisible intraocular tumors in children: Detection with multimodal imaging. Presented at: Wills Eye Conference; March 8-10, 2018; Philadelphia.

Disclosure: Shields reports no relevant financial disclosures.

PHILADELPHIA — Multimodal imaging can assist in detecting intraocular tumors that cannot be seen with ophthalmoscopy, according to a speaker at the Wills Eye Conference.

“We call these invisible intraocular tumors ‘ghost’ tumors because they are impossible to see with ophthalmoscopy but visible with multimodal imaging,” Jerry A. Shields, MD, said.

Between 1% and 2% of eyes with retinoblastoma, retinal hemangioblastoma and retinal astrocytic hamartoma have subclinical ghost tumors. Shields discussed seven examples in which the fundus appeared normal, but multimodal imaging detected retinal hemangioblastoma, retinal astrocytic hamartoma, choroidal metastasis, iris microhemangiomatosis or choroidal melanoma.

OCT, fluorescein angiography and autofluorescence were the imaging methods most likely to detect an invisible tumor.

“Multimodal imaging can help detect these invisible tumors, and this might allow for earlier diagnosis and prompt treatment for selected subclinical tumors in the future,” Shields said. – by Rebecca L. Forand

 

Reference:

Shields JA. Invisible intraocular tumors in children: Detection with multimodal imaging. Presented at: Wills Eye Conference; March 8-10, 2018; Philadelphia.

Disclosure: Shields reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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