In the Journals

Neoadjuvant intra-arterial cytoreductive chemotherapy may improve survival in patients with lacrimal gland adenoid cystic carcinoma

Patients with lacrimal gland adenoid cystic carcinoma may be treated with neoadjuvant intra-arterial cytoreductive chemotherapy instead of conventional treatment for improved survival, according to a study.

The retrospective case series included 19 consecutive patients treated with intra-arterial cytoreductive chemotherapy. Disease relapse, disease-free survival and chemotherapeutic complications were all measured. 

Eight patients with an intact lacrimal artery had better survival outcomes and recurrences (100% vs. 28.6% at 10 years) than patients treated conventionally. The 11 patients who had an absence of the lacrimal artery had a 50% disease-free survival rate at 10 years.

Intra-arterial cytoreductive chemotherapy reduced tumor size and decreased the tumor burden, according to the study authors.

Disclosure: The study authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with lacrimal gland adenoid cystic carcinoma may be treated with neoadjuvant intra-arterial cytoreductive chemotherapy instead of conventional treatment for improved survival, according to a study.

The retrospective case series included 19 consecutive patients treated with intra-arterial cytoreductive chemotherapy. Disease relapse, disease-free survival and chemotherapeutic complications were all measured. 

Eight patients with an intact lacrimal artery had better survival outcomes and recurrences (100% vs. 28.6% at 10 years) than patients treated conventionally. The 11 patients who had an absence of the lacrimal artery had a 50% disease-free survival rate at 10 years.

Intra-arterial cytoreductive chemotherapy reduced tumor size and decreased the tumor burden, according to the study authors.

Disclosure: The study authors report no relevant financial disclosures.