Dominant eye has higher degree of myopia in anisometropia

In eyes with highly anisometropic myopia, the dominant eye has a greater degree of myopia than the nondominant eye, according to a study.

Ching-Yu Cheng and colleagues in Taipei, Taiwan, recruited 55 subjects with anisometropic myopia into a study to determine the association between ocular dominance and degree of myopia. None of the subjects had amblyopia.

Beyond a threshold level of anisometropia of 1.75 D, the dominant eye was always more myopic than the nondominant eye. Of the 33 participants with anisometropia of 1.75 D or less, the dominant eye was more myopic in 51.5%.

Dominant eyes had a significantly greater myopic spherical equivalent than nondominant eyes. Dominant eyes also had greater axial length.

The differences were more pronounced in participants with higher anisometropia but not significant in those with lower anisometropia.

The study is published in the August issue of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

In eyes with highly anisometropic myopia, the dominant eye has a greater degree of myopia than the nondominant eye, according to a study.

Ching-Yu Cheng and colleagues in Taipei, Taiwan, recruited 55 subjects with anisometropic myopia into a study to determine the association between ocular dominance and degree of myopia. None of the subjects had amblyopia.

Beyond a threshold level of anisometropia of 1.75 D, the dominant eye was always more myopic than the nondominant eye. Of the 33 participants with anisometropia of 1.75 D or less, the dominant eye was more myopic in 51.5%.

Dominant eyes had a significantly greater myopic spherical equivalent than nondominant eyes. Dominant eyes also had greater axial length.

The differences were more pronounced in participants with higher anisometropia but not significant in those with lower anisometropia.

The study is published in the August issue of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.