Eyenovia phase 2 trial shows positive results in microtherapeutic approach to dosing

Eyenovia’s topical piezo-print microtherapeutic approach to dosing has shown positive safety and efficacy results in a phase 2 study, the company announced in a press release.

The EYE 102 study showed an 8% reduction in ocular side effects with the microtherapeutic approach compared with 66% with conventional topical treatment, the release said.

Microdosing also showed better “pharmacologic effect and bioavailability over dose-equivalent dropper therapy,” the release said.

“This could have considerable impact as we grow the clinical application into chronic eye diseases such as glaucoma, dry eye and allergic eye disease, where the treatment paradigm has been hampered by overdose-related safety problems such as eye irritation, redness, and even systemic cardiovascular and respiratory side effects,” OSN Glaucoma Board Member Robert N. Weinreb, MD, chairman and distinguished professor of ophthalmology at the University of San Diego, and director of the Shiley Eye Institute and the Hamilton Glaucoma Center, said in the release.

Eyenovia’s topical piezo-print microtherapeutic approach to dosing has shown positive safety and efficacy results in a phase 2 study, the company announced in a press release.

The EYE 102 study showed an 8% reduction in ocular side effects with the microtherapeutic approach compared with 66% with conventional topical treatment, the release said.

Microdosing also showed better “pharmacologic effect and bioavailability over dose-equivalent dropper therapy,” the release said.

“This could have considerable impact as we grow the clinical application into chronic eye diseases such as glaucoma, dry eye and allergic eye disease, where the treatment paradigm has been hampered by overdose-related safety problems such as eye irritation, redness, and even systemic cardiovascular and respiratory side effects,” OSN Glaucoma Board Member Robert N. Weinreb, MD, chairman and distinguished professor of ophthalmology at the University of San Diego, and director of the Shiley Eye Institute and the Hamilton Glaucoma Center, said in the release.