Ophthalmic Surgery, Lasers and Imaging Retina

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Images in Ophthalmology 

Decompression “Iridopathy” Following Diode Laser Cycloablation

Theresa A. Williams, MBBCh; Freda Sii, MBBS; Mark Chiang, MBBS; Peter Shah, MBBCh

Abstract

From Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

The authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Address correspondence to Theresa A. Williams, MBBCh, Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Dudley Road, Birmingham B18 7QU, United Kingdom.

A 75-year-old man underwent routine transscleral diode laser cycloablation laser (40 × 1,500 mW × 1,500 ms) for neovascular glaucoma secondary to an ischemic central retinal vein occlusion. Intraocular pressure was 60 mm Hg preoperatively and 6 mm Hg on the first postoperative day with multiple mid-peripheral iris hemorrhages (Figure). The location of the hemorrhages in the mid-periphery corresponded with the presence of the rubeotic vessels.

Decompression retinopathy secondary to a precipitous reduction in intraocular pressure has previously been described.1 We propose the term decompression “iridopathy” for this phenomenon.…

From Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

The authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Address correspondence to Theresa A. Williams, MBBCh, Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Dudley Road, Birmingham B18 7QU, United Kingdom.

Accepted: May 27, 2009
Posted Online: March 09, 2010

Introduction

A 75-year-old man underwent routine transscleral diode laser cycloablation laser (40 × 1,500 mW × 1,500 ms) for neovascular glaucoma secondary to an ischemic central retinal vein occlusion. Intraocular pressure was 60 mm Hg preoperatively and 6 mm Hg on the first postoperative day with multiple mid-peripheral iris hemorrhages (Figure). The location of the hemorrhages in the mid-periphery corresponded with the presence of the rubeotic vessels.

(A) Low and (B) High Magnification View of Iris Hemorrhages in a Case of Rubeotic Glaucoma Following Routine Transscleral Diode Laser Cycloablation. The Location of the Hemorrhages in the Mid-Periphery Corresponded with the Presence of the Rubeotic Vessels. A Peripheral Iridotomy Previously Performed Due to a Potentially Occludable Drainage Angle Is also Visible.

Figure. (A) Low and (B) High Magnification View of Iris Hemorrhages in a Case of Rubeotic Glaucoma Following Routine Transscleral Diode Laser Cycloablation. The Location of the Hemorrhages in the Mid-Periphery Corresponded with the Presence of the Rubeotic Vessels. A Peripheral Iridotomy Previously Performed Due to a Potentially Occludable Drainage Angle Is also Visible.

Comment

Decompression retinopathy secondary to a precipitous reduction in intraocular pressure has previously been described.1 We propose the term decompression “iridopathy” for this phenomenon.

Reference

  1. Fechner RD, Minckler D, Weinreb RN, Frangei G, Jampol LM. Complications of glaucoma surgery: ocular decompression retinopathy. Arch Ophthalmol. 1992;110:965–968.
Authors

From Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

The authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Address correspondence to Theresa A. Williams, MBBCh, Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Dudley Road, Birmingham B18 7QU, United Kingdom.

10.3928/15428877-20100216-12

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