Ophthalmic Surgery, Lasers and Imaging Retina

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Technique 

Ultrahigh-Resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Lamina Cribrosa

Larry Kagemann, MS; Hiroshi Ishikawa, MD; Gadi Wollstein, MD; Peter M. Brennen, MD; Kelly A. Townsend, BS; Michelle Gabriele; Joel S. Schuman, MD

Abstract

Study of the structure of the lamina cribrosa is critical in glaucoma research. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging protocol for the digital isolation and display of the lamina cribrosa. Three-dimensional datasets centered on the lamina cribrosa were obtained with 200 3 200 to 512 3 512 A-scan densities. The effect of scan density and c-mode slab thickness was subjectively compared. Increasing slab thickness reduced the sharpness of visible prelamina and lamina cribrosa structures. In retrolamina structures, thin slabs provided good visualization, but increased slab size increased the visibility of deeper structures. Scan times as short as 2.3 seconds (256 3 256 A-scans) degraded visualization of the shape of the optic nerve head. The optical scan protocol for lamina cribrosa imaging appears to be a 3 3 3 mm 200 3 200 A-scan volume with the lamina cribrosa positioned near direct current. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2008;39:S126-S131.]

Abstract

Study of the structure of the lamina cribrosa is critical in glaucoma research. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging protocol for the digital isolation and display of the lamina cribrosa. Three-dimensional datasets centered on the lamina cribrosa were obtained with 200 3 200 to 512 3 512 A-scan densities. The effect of scan density and c-mode slab thickness was subjectively compared. Increasing slab thickness reduced the sharpness of visible prelamina and lamina cribrosa structures. In retrolamina structures, thin slabs provided good visualization, but increased slab size increased the visibility of deeper structures. Scan times as short as 2.3 seconds (256 3 256 A-scans) degraded visualization of the shape of the optic nerve head. The optical scan protocol for lamina cribrosa imaging appears to be a 3 3 3 mm 200 3 200 A-scan volume with the lamina cribrosa positioned near direct current. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2008;39:S126-S131.]
Authors

From UPMC Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, University of Pittsburgh (LK, HI, GW, PMB, KAT, MLG, JSS); the Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh (LK, HI, MLG); and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (JSS).

Accepted for publication February 18, 2008.

Supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01-EY13178-08, R01-EY11289-22, and P30-EY008098; The Eye and Ear Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and unrestricted grants from Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc., New York, New York.

Dr. Schuman receives royalties from intellectual property licensed by M.I.T. to Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. Dr. Wollstein receives grant support from Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., and Optovue.

Dr. Schuman did not participate in the editorial review of this manuscript.

Address correspondence to Joel S. Schuman, MD, UPMC Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 203 Lothrop Street, Eye and Ear Institute, Suite 816, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.

10.3928/15428877-20080715-07

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